April 10

Response for “What Are Homosexuals For?”

Gay pride 365 - Marche des fiertés Toulouse 2011.jpg
Photo Credit: Guillaume Paumier via CompfightSullivan makes a compelling argument in his essay. First, explain exactly what you believe his argument is and then choose three of the concrete details from your TEJs to illustrate how he supports his argument. In other words, how does what he said support what your saw? Be sure to thoroughly explicate your quotes from the text. Proofread for pronoun antecedent agreement. Due Friday!

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Posted April 10, 2013 by tashak38 in category Uncategorized

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53 thoughts on “Response for “What Are Homosexuals For?”

  1. Ryan

    Ryan C.
    Ms. Keeble
    Period 1

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, “What are Homosexual For”, he argues how homosexuals are different and have hard lives. One example that Sullivan puts out is about a man he knew. “He set about reordering his life; in his late middle age; he began to have adolescent affairs; he declared his sexuality loudly and somewhat crudely to anyone who could hear; he unloaded himself to his friends and loved ones. But… had regained himself before he lost himself forever.” (381)What Sullivan is trying to point out is that this man opened himself up and spoke out about his sexuality because the secret ness will drain the life out of people. Another example is when he says, “The truth is, homosexual are not entirely normal … is essential and exhilarating about their otherness.” (391) Sullivan is stating that their difference is something to look forward for it would be exciting. Finally Sullivan concludes his essay saying, “Perhaps it requires seeing one’s life as the end of a biological chain, or seeing one’s deepest emotions as the object of detestation, that provides this insight. He is saying that society needs to understand these differences to find insight.

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  2. Jhoann B.

    Jhoann B.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP Eng 11 Per 2
    15 April 2013

    In his essay, “What are Homosexuals for?” Sullivan exhibits the tribulations homosexuals endure in our discriminatory society and argues that everyone should be treated equal, regardless of his or her sexual orientation. Sullivan asserts, “I believe strongly that marriage should be made available to everyone, in politics of strict public neutrality. But within this model, there is plenty of scope for cultural difference.” (391) He includes this assertion in his essay to demonstrate the conflicting opinions regarding the tolerance of homosexual marriage and convey this as a form of discrimination. Sullivan uses the term “everyone” to stress the concept of egalitarianism, expressing that homosexuals and heterosexuals should be treated equally. All of us, regardless of sexual preferences, should be subject to the same laws and be able to enjoy the same privileges. Sullivan also discusses the valuable role of homosexuals in society, revealing that “in gay bars, there was far less socioeconomic stratification than in heterosexual.” (390) This quote supplements Sullivan’s main argument because it exhibits the valuable role of homosexuals in society as open-minded and self-expressive individuals. He celebrates this characteristic of the homosexual community and suggests that homosexuals do not inhibit society’s growth. In his conclusion, Sullivan conveys that “there is beauty in the wild flowers that grow randomly among our wheat.” (392) This metaphor illustrates homosexuals as “wild flowers” who have the potential to beneficially contribute to society but are being hindered from doing so by the discrimination that surrounds them. Like Sullivan, I think that we should all accept our differences and work together on a foundation based on equality for the good of the community.

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  3. Joelynn D.

    Joelynn D.

    Ms. Keeble

    English – 2nd period

    15 April 2013

    In his essay, “What are Homosexuals For?” Andrew Sullivan explores the hardships homosexuals face while living in a profoundly heterosexual society. For instance, since homosexuality is not as accepted, there are many individuals who deny being gay or avoid the subject altogether. As Sullivan says, “The sublimation of sexual longing…But it also leads to some devastating loneliness” (380). By hiding ones true sexuality and sexual longing, an individual may only seem normal to society when, in reality, he or she is unhappy and emotionless inside. Especially because of the pressures from society to fit in, many homosexuals are then afraid to either open up or admit to being gay. In rare cases it does lead to brilliant lives, but more so than not, hiding one’s sexuality only creates inner frustration and loneliness.

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  4. Adria

    Adria W.
    Per 2
    4/15/13

    In his essay “What are Homosexuals for?”, Andrew Sullivan argues the difficulties of finding yourself in a society that has a hard time accepting people who a different. Throughout the essay Sullivan explains the difficulties that homosexuals face in their lives that heterosexuals do not. Sullivan uses the absence of intimacy as an example of finding yourself. He states, “The abandonment of intimacy and the rejection of one’s emotional core are…expense of the person.”(380. Sullivan is saying that without intimacy, a persons identity would be hard to distinguish because they hide who they truly are. Sullivan describes being “in the closet” as a way for him to understand “normal”. He says, “Within a year, I was both privately and publicly someone who attempted…finally into a normal life.”(383). Sullivan kept his homosexual life private because he believed that if he made it public he wouldn’t have a “normal life”, which made it seem like he felt that he wasn’t being true to himself. I believe that normal does not necessarily have to be what society makes it out to be but rather how your methods and beliefs have shaped you as a person.

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  5. Caleb M.

    Caleb M.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English, Per. 2
    15 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan argues how homosexuals are placed into a subgroup of the American culture which makes it difficult for them to happily live in our current society and are often stereotyped. Sullivan writes, “I was the equal of he heterosexuals, deserving of exactly the same respect, attempting to construct in the necessarily contrived world of the gay subculture the mirror image of the happy heterosexuality I imagined around me.”(383) Sullivan explains how he, as a homosexual, strived to achieve the same type of happiness as a heterosexual, while living in a dominant heterosexual culture. He analyzes, “Homosexuals in contemporary America tend to die young… by the arch symbols of cultural otherness.” (383) Sullivan elucidates that our current society is somewhat ignorant to homosexuality and how difficult it is for them to achieve true contentment because they feel isolated from the rest of society. Lastly, Sullivan comprises, “it has become virtually a definition of “racist” to make any substantive generalizations about a particular ethnicity, and a definition of “homophobic” to make any generalizations about homosexuals.” (386) He connects how homosexuals are placed into specific stereotypes based on their sexuality like some ethnicities are placed into specific stereotypes based on their ethnicity. In closing, Sullivan uses personal experiences and cultural observations to argue how homosexuals continuously struggle to fit in with society.

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  6. Jasmine J.

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, ” What Are Homosexuals For?” he states the trials homosexuals go through as they discover who they really and what it is that they really want. Sullivan compares being a homosexual in this society to others by saying, “Like Jews who have developed ways to resist, subvert, and adopt a majority culture…” (Sullivan 388). He also talks about the process of discovering that you are homosexual. Sullivan asserts, “The discovery of one’s homosexuality is for many people the same experience as acting upon it” (Sullivan 308). To top it off, Sullivan discussed how difficult it was living in secret when it comes to ones sexuality. He described a man who, “set about re-ordering his life; in his late middle age, he was having adolescent affairs;he declared his sexuality loudly and somewhat crudely to anyone who could hear; he unloaded himself to his friends and loved ones.” (Sullivan 381). Sullivan allowed us to delve into the mindset of a homosexual in his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” therefore allowing us to have a better understanding.

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  7. Maliko P.

    Maliko P.
    April 15, 2013
    Period:02

    In his essay, Andrew Sullivan, makes a compelling argument about the adversities and discrimination against homosexuals in our society. One example that Sullivan states is “But something of the gay relationships… Heterosexual bonds,” (390) this depicts to the reader that homosexuals do not have a negative effect on society. Another instance is when Sullivan states “You are caught between a escape and the constant daily wrench of self denial.”(382) This exemplifies that our society has become so cruel and judgmental that homosexuals rather attempt to stay oblivious of who they really are than to be true to themselves and others. The final example is ” they die like all people die” (383) it’s short simplicity demonstrates that homosexuals are still human and deserve the same respect and humanity as any heterosexual human being.

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  8. Kiana Ledda

    Kiana Ledda
    Keeble
    AP English, Period 5
    April 14, 2013

    In his argument, “What Are Homosexuals For”, writer and lecturer, Andrew Sullivan, deciphers the different types of hardships that homosexuals endure that heterosexuals do not. He introduces his essay with, “The abandonment of intimacy and the rejection of one’s emotional core are, I have come to believe, alloyed evils,” (Sullivan 380). He is implying that many people stereotype homosexuals, giving homosexuals a more difficult time to be themselves in our society. He then goes more into detail with his assertion on gay marriage being discriminated. Sullivan states, “Heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary emotional goal for your peers; and you know this cannot be your fate. It terrifies and alarms you,” (Sullivan 381). He is explaining that many people think that marriage should only consist with the opposite sex, giving homosexuals unfair treatment and difficulty to get married. Sullivan then adds to his argument with, “The acceptance of diversity has come to mean the acceptance of essential sameness of all types of people, and the danger of generalizing among them at all,” (Sullivan 386). He is arguing that people have become close minded because they simply cannot treat homosexuals with the same respect or give them the same rights as heterosexuals. Throughout this entire essay, Sullivan has been implying that our society is very conservative and that whoever is trying to bend the status quo, should be alienated.

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  9. Bilguun Batdorj

    Bilguun Batdorj

    Ms Keeble

    AP English

    4/12/13

    In “What are Homosexuals For?” Sullivan explains that homosexual individuals have a different socioeconomic status than heterosexual individuals. The author explains to the audience that a lot of homosexuals are trapped in a void of denial in which “there was no forward, no future to move into.” (381 Sullivan) To some extend a few number of homosexual individuals come out of the darkness unbattered emotionally, including the author “I was lucky. I found an escape..” (382 Sullivan) What the author is trying to say is that homosexuals feel different towards life because they experience different experiences on marriage, children, Aids and death. A very unique way the author conveys to the audience is by comparing his 30 year old homosexual and heterosexual friend’s birthday parties. In one point the homosexual friend,” The first was a gay friend’s thirtieth birthday party…he told them he had AIDS that Memorial Day,” symbolizes death and a fake mask of happiness (sadness). Concurrently, the heterosexual friend,” another thirty-year-old friend of mine. This one was heterosexual;and he and his fiancee were getting married..,” symbolizes rebirth and happiness.

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  10. Alexis l.

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, ” What Are Homosexuals For?” he states the difficulties homosexuals go through when revealing and finding who they truly are. Many homosexual people live their lives unsure of themselves, causing them to isolate themselves from people.” But it also leads to some devastating loneliness.”, Sullivan depicts the pain that some homosexuals go through while trying to discover their sexuality. Sullivan went through a rough patch in his life when i found out he was gay.” The discovery of one’s homosexuality is for many people the same experience as acting upon it.”, some people in today’s society have found it easier than others to discover their sexuality, but in some cases a person might find great difficulty in accomplishing that. ” He regained himself before he lost himself forever.”, some people live their whole life unaware of who they are. Finding one’s self is more difficult than people expect it to be.

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  11. Tanzeel H.

    Tanzeel Hak
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English, Period 2
    12 April 2013

    In Sullivan’s essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” he goes in depth on how homosexuals’ lives are very different compared to heterosexuals from Aids, deaths, marriage, and children. He believes that society is not very welcoming for homosexuals. Since growing up homosexuals realize that their lives will not be the same as their heterosexuals colleagues they keep their sexuality to themselves because they do not want to feel different like an outcast. Sullivan explains, “This may lead to some brilliant lives: witty, urbane, subtle, passionate. But it also leads to some devastating loneliness” (Sullivan 380). Sullivan feels that homosexuals are often very lonely, especially due to the fact they do not want society to look down upon them, so they remain silent about their sexuality. Other then the sexual part of their lives, everything else resembles a heterosexual’s life. Sullivan then makes a comparison, “Like Jews who have developed ways to resist, subvert, and adopt a majority culture…” (Sullivan 388). Sullivan makes a bold statement that puts how he feels in perspective. By comparing Jews to homosexuals, Sullivan illustrates that homosexuals have been discriminated against just like the Jews to the extent to where they could not be who they were, but had to change to fit in to the community. Sullivan adds, “that there is no reason in mystery; that there is beauty in the wild flowers that grow randomly among the wheat” (Sullivan 392). Sullivan attempts to convince homosexuals that they should come out whenever they figure out their true sexual orientation. They should not look at themselves as any less than heterosexuals. Sullivan concludes that homosexuals might stand out in a community filled with heterosexuals, but not in a negative way.

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  12. Merritt Walker

    Merritt Walker
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 2
    12 April 2013

    In Andrew Sullivan’s argument “What Are Homosexuals For?” He argues that homosexuals face more hardships and struggles than heterosexuals and they cannot truly be themselves because of society. Gays and lesbians are discriminated an stereotyped because they like a person of the same-sex. “The abandonment of intimacy and the rejection of one’s emotional core are, I have come to believe, alloyed evils”(380). Homosexuals block out their emotions to appeal to society. They reject who they are to fit into society’s “norm” at the cost of losing their identity. “Growing up homosexual was to grow up normal but displaced; to experience romantic love, but with the wrong person…to seek a gradual self-awakening, but in secret, not in public”(383). Sullivan grew up with hopes and dreams only to be crushed by society. He can get married just not with a man. If he is with one he cannot be in public. They constantly have to hide themselves because they are afraid of the consequences they could face when they come out. “He had regained himself before he lost himself before he lost himself forever”(381). He was able to come and be himself before he completely gave up on life. Homosexuals and heterosexuals are equal and they should not be treated differently. They should be able to come out and feel good about it.

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  13. Canyon Riley

    Canyon Riley
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 11
    12 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s premise in his argument is that homosexuals are constantly secluded from society, which pressures some homosexuals to hide their sexuality, killing themselves from the inside out. He states,” The abandonment of intimacy and the rejection of one’s emotional core are, I have come to believe, alloyed evils,”(380). The “alloyed” evils are the bad stereotypes given to homosexuals by the people who discriminate against homosexuality. The threats against homosexuals are nothing without a group of people believing and expressing those ideas. Sullivan also says,” For many of us a shared love is elusive anyway, a goal we rarely achieve, and, when we do, find extremely hard to maintain” (381). He elaborates on the fact that when people do attack homosexual relationships, those people will try to glorify heterosexual relationships, such as marriage. But such a commitment is hard to find, let alone maintain, which is why there is an option for divorce if someone’s partner is not that, “special” someone. Lastly, Sullivan states,” The acceptance of diversity has come to mean the acceptance of essential sameness of all types of people, and the danger of generalizing among them at all” (386). He conveys that the term diversity is used extensively and can sometimes mislead our brains into thinking it is a good thing. This nation is has plenty of diversity, but most do not accept this diversity so those individuals will try to alienate others who are differen

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  14. Phuong-My N.

    Phuong-My N.
    Keeble
    AP English, Per. 2
    12 April 2013

    In his argument, “What Are Homosexuals For?”(1995), Andrew Sullivan explains the difficulties homosexuals have to face compared to heterosexuals. He asserts that being homosexual leads to more obstacles in life due to secretion, diseases, and having children. For example, Sullivan states, “These city limits are the equivalent of the adolescent’s bedroom door: a barrier where two lives can be maintained with some hope of success and a minimal amount of mutual embarrassment,”(382) to allow others to see how homosexuals have to be secretive in order not to be humiliated for their sexuality. Even he, as an adult, endures the same type of situation as an adolescent. Next, he claims, “AIDS has intensified a difference that I think is inherent between homosexual and heterosexual adult,”(385) because AIDS are more common in homosexuals. He even describes, “My straight peers in their early thirties are engaged in the business of births; I am largely engaged in the business of deaths”(385). Lastly, Sullivan introduces the topic of procreation. He clarifies, “This role in the anesthetization of the culture is perhaps enhanced by another unavoidable fact about most homosexuals and lesbians: their childlessness,”(388) to illustrate a huge difference between the two kinds of sexuality. He then moves on to say, “The lack of children is something most homosexuals regard as a curse; and it is the thing which many heterosexuals most pity (and some envy) about their homosexual acquaintances”(289). Sure, homosexuals can adopt, but there is no greater bond than having their own biological children.

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    1. Phuong-My N.

      Phuong-My N.
      Keeble
      AP English, Per. 2
      12 April 2013

      In his argument, “What Are Homosexuals For?”(1995), Andrew Sullivan explains the difficulties homosexuals have to face compared to heterosexuals. He asserts that being homosexual leads to more obstacles in life due to keeping secrets, diseases, and having children. For example, Sullivan states, “These city limits are the equivalent of the adolescent’s bedroom door: a barrier where two lives can be maintained with some hope of success and a minimal amount of mutual embarrassment,”(382) to allow others to see how homosexuals have to be secretive in order not to be humiliated for their sexuality. Even he, as an adult, endures the same type of situation as an adolescent. Next, he claims, “AIDS has intensified a difference that I think is inherent between homosexual and heterosexual adult,”(385) because AIDS are more common in homosexuals. He even describes, “My straight peers in their early thirties are engaged in the business of births; I am largely engaged in the business of deaths”(385). Lastly, Sullivan introduces the topic of procreation. He clarifies, “This role in the anesthetization of the culture is perhaps enhanced by another unavoidable fact about most homosexuals and lesbians: their childlessness,”(388) to illustrate a huge difference between the two kinds of sexuality. He then moves on to say, “The lack of children is something most homosexuals regard as a curse; and it is the thing which many heterosexuals most pity (and some envy) about their homosexual acquaintances”(289). Sure, homosexuals can adopt, but there is no greater bond than having their own biological children.

      *Sorry again, Ms. Keeble, for the misuse of the word…Hehe.

      Reply
  15. Johanna G.

    Johanna G.
    Keeble
    AP English, Per. 2
    12 April, 2012

    In his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” Andrew Sullivan argues the difficulties that homosexuals experience throughout their life and describes that they face more discrimination than a heterosexual. For example, “But to make the lack of such an achievement a condition of one’s existence…For him, there was no forward, no future to move into.” (Sullivan 381) I believe that it is more difficult to find love or be loved when you’re a homosexual because people will easily judge you and your partner. It is also a challenge because most homosexuals still hide their identity because they are afraid of society and how people will see them, making it harder for one to find a partner. Sullivan also asserts that “The lack of children is something some homosexuals regard as a curse…” (Sullivan 389) He explains that homosexuals consider not having a child as bad as a curse. In my opinion, having a child with someone when you’re both grown and married completes your family because they bring a different kind of happiness to you. Another example is, “But at his funeral, I couldn’t help but reflect the he had at least tasted…before he lost himself forever.” (Sullivan 381) Sullivan describes that this man got to actually live his life, even if it was only for three years. He believes this because he got to experience life without keeping his identity a secret. Sullivan’s purpose throughout his essay was to illustrate the hardships that homosexuals go through every day.

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  16. Oscar G.

    Oscar G.
    April 11, 2013
    Andrew Sullivan’s essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” ideally relies around the idea that homosexuals have a greater difficulty finding their spot in society and are not capable of living the normal life of a straight person. Sullivan goes to state, “heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary emotional goal for your peers; and yet you know this cannot be your fate” (pg. 381). Sullivan is putting the reader with a different perspective with one that perhaps does not match with who the truly are, a homosexual. But he does this to achieve his purpose of pointing out that society by its self throws out spots that homosexuals are expected to fill in as if nothing wrong about that. Later Sullivan states, “This need not mean, as some have historically claimed, that homosexuals have no state in the sustenance of a society, but rather that their role is somewhat different…” (391). Sullivan gets to the point that he is trying to get his audience to understand that homosexuals may never live the life of a, straight person for so to say. With making them feel different, alienated and unlike anybody else. Throughout Sullivan’s essay he points to the points that homosexuals are labeled without reasoning to live in a certain spot of society and that they will not be capable of living the average human life.

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  17. DaJohn Wade

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument on homosexuals describes the tribulations they endure in life. He’s conveying the experiences and informing us that even though they have made these controversial choices, they too are apart of society. He says, “Others never experienced more dreadful epiphanies (pg. 381). The horrible realizations about is sexual orientation in the eyes of society came to light for Sullivan. His 6th sense on what people truly perceive homosexuality as activated. Also, when he says, “They die like all people die (pg. 383), Sullivan exposes the truth many pay no attention to; gay people are too, in fact, people. Despite the choices they made and the gender they prefer, their infrastructure is no different from a homosexual’s. Lastly, Sullivan says, “But the homosexual’s contribution can be more than nourishing to the society’s aesthetic and institutional life (pg. 389).” Instead of being segregated to certain aspects of contributing, Sullivan is explaining how the spectrum could be broaden for homosexuals. They have much more to offer than what society associates them with. Overall Sullivan’s goal was to enlighten us on the life of a homosexual and what pros can come from more acceptance.

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  18. Elvia Lopez

    Elvia Lopez
    AP English
    Keeble
    April 12, 2013

    In Andrew Sullivans essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” he argues the hardships of being homosexual and how discrimination over sex appeal affect their daily lives. At first, he begins to talk about his life and various things he has overcame, later on in the essay he begins to talk about the effect from those experiences or just overall experiences from others. He makes this topic seem very tough to read about, but very easy to understand. Especially by understanding and putting ourselves in their shoes. One example of how author Sullivans portrays his essay in a negative way is when he says, “I suppose we all understood that somewhere he was a homosexual, had few women friends, and no emotional or sexual life to speak of.” (pg.381) This brings a negative connotation toward his essay because he is stating that when homosexuals go through a lonely life because they are afraid of bringing out their inner soul to the community. Another example of how a homosexual might feel is, “The abandonment of intimacy and the rejection of one’s emotional core are, I have come to believe, alloyed evils.”(Pg.380) This brings out the truth that if there is no intimacy is because of rejection. This is where homosexual’s depression come in and may individuals suffer from that. An example of how a homosexual feels when they were first kissed is when author Sullivan defines his feeling like no other. He explains that he felt like he was in a black and white movie that suddenly covered to color. This explains how many people might feel to express their choosing on the sex they want to be with, but although this is the case, many are afraid to put their feelings out into society and that is where insecureness continues.

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  19. David .D

    David Delgado
    Ms. Keeble
    Period 2
    11 April 2013

    In “What Are Homosexuals For?” Sullivan is arguing to have people embrace who they are, and to not be afraid of what other people think. Sullivan states “I remember my first kiss with another man, the first embracement, the first love affair.” (pg.382) He wasn’t really concerned as much as to what people thought of him at first. There were times where Sullivan felt uncomfortable expressing his sexuality, but he expressed himself anyways. Another thing Sullivan asserts is “The acceptance of diversity has come to mean the acceptance of the essential sameness of all types of people, and the danger of generalizing among them at all.” (pg.386) People need to accept themselves for who they are instead of hiding themselves from others. Also as a society we need to accept homosexuals for who they are instead of putting them down. We accept people for their beliefs and culture and that is no different than accepting someone for their sexuality. Lastly Sullivan says “ In fact, it has become virtually a definition of ‘racist’ to make any substantive generalization about a particular ethnicity, and a definition of ‘homophobic’ tom make a generalizations about homosexuals.” (pg.386) I agree with Sullivan’s statement it is racist to make a substantial generalization about homosexuals. It is wrong to be racist in general but especially them; they just want to be happy with themselves. Overall homosexuals should be themselves and not hide in the shadows, and society needs to learn to accept them.

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  20. Andrea O

    Andrea O.
    AP English
    Per.2
    In the compelling essay , “What Are Homosexuals For?”, Andrew Sullivan compares and contrasts the experiences of both homosexuals and heterosexuals as they grow up and the effect these differences have in their lives .I think that he argues that while these differences exert pressure and sometimes are the reason for their dilemmas , they should be celebrated because without these differences their individualism would not be as “essential and exhilarating.” He begins by describing the transformation homosexuals go through once they leave their home and accepts their sexuality . He states that “ The richness of experience seemed possible for the first time…pleasure of being human.” (50 Essays p.382) and tells how their sexual awaking although very different and usually delayed from heterosexuals is in his eyes a difference that should be celebrated . Sullivan supports his argument by stating that “Sometimes , by virtue of having to suppress their natural emotions…reinforce these traits.” (50 Essays p.387) . He explains that while growing up homosexual children have to suppress their inner feelings and disguise them so as a result they develop skills that tend to set up their lives and their trajectories on specific paths. The development of such traits does not occur in normal children and in Sullivan’s eyes is another key difference. Throughout his essay , Sullivan uses a personal anecdote to allow the reader to follow his development and understand how his lifestyle has shaped who he is and who he surrounds himself with .Additionally , Sullivan describes how the people in his life influence who he is and his view on life. Finally , he finishes the essay and concludes his argument by saying that “But the seeds of homosexual wisdom ..contain the truth that order is in fact a euphemism… there is beauty in the wild flowers that grow randomly among our wheat.” (50 Essays p.392) . I can interpret this as further support for his argument because he is using the “wild flowers” as a symbol for homosexuals and to clearly tie his argument to a simpler concept that is easier to visualize as these wild flowers are random among “our wheat” which is our Earth and should be appreciated .All in all, I believe that in his essay Sullivan argues that the differences in the upbringing and life of homosexuals should be cherished rather than seen as negative factor because without these factors their lives would not be as interesting.

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  21. Abraham N.

    Abraham N.
    AP English 11
    Ms. Keeble
    Period 5
    11 April 2013

    Author Andrew Sullivan’s argument for, “What Are Homosexuals For?” is that it’s hard to be a homosexual and how “easier” it is for a straight person to live life , and various obstacles that homosexuals face. Sullivan uses multiple examples of people he has came across in life as certain examples to enhance his argument. Sullivan proclaims, “I found an escape into a world of idea into a career; and into another country” (P.382). The author is saying that his native country of England couldn’t accept his homosexuality in a suitable manner, so he decided to basically begin a new life in a place where he is unknown in, which is America. The author claims that another challenge that effects homosexuals is loneliness, and in page 383, he states, “Lesbian women can find themselves slowly distanced from the company of men; gay men can find themselves slowly disentangled from women” (p.383). Many would think that lesbians and gays would tend to stick together as they face the challenges of living in a society that is not made for them, but the author actually says that it is the opposite. Another challenge the author states is that it may be difficult for a homosexual to fit in with society, and he believed that, “the closeted homosexual was a useful social creature, and possibly happier than those immersed in what sometimes seems like a merciless and shallow subculture” (p.381). Sullivan basically states that he thought that homosexuals could fit in with society great, but it has been a challenge for him and others.

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  22. Dominique

    Dominique N.
    Keeble
    AP English 11 2
    11 April 2013

    In his essay “What are Homosexuals For?” Andrew Sullivan argues that homosexuals face a life much different and more difficult than that of a heterosexual. He emphasizes the discrimination a homosexual faces on a daily basis and how it feels to be treated so cruelly as a consequence for being attracted to the same gender. “I remember a man…he was a homosexual…he realized at that moment that there was no honesty at the core of his live, and no love at its center. The recognition of this emptiness literally paralyzed him.” (381) Sullivan explains how a homosexual was excluded from society because of his homosexuality, and after he came out to reveal himself, his lived a life of solitude and misery. “One day, I glanced at my log of telephone calls: the ratio of men to women, once roughly even, had become six-to-one male.” (384) Sullivan discusses his own experience of how after he came out, his social status dramatically changed. He lost contact with some of his very close friends, for they most likely stopped associating with him after they found out about his sexuality. “Go to any march for gay rights and you will see the impossibility of organizing it into a coherent lobby…” (391) Sullivan implies that society does not give a damn about anything dealing with the rights and pride of homosexuals. A lot of people do not want to waste their time and listen to gays preach for rights, it is just irrelevant. In conclusion, Sullivan presents to the audience that homosexuals live a very different life than heterosexuals and they struggle to fit in with society.

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  23. Rebekah Novak

    Rebekah
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English
    11 April 2013

    In my opinion, mainly in the beginning of the essay, it seemed like Sullivan was attempting to convince the audience of the normality of being gay. He first uses his own personal life examples then generalizes the lives many others may have went through like him. “He had regained himself before he lost himself forever” is one example of how the author tried understanding subjects in his text. He talked about how a friend of his realized his passion right before he passed away and his amazement at that. Sullivan uses this to explain to the audience that many people discover hidden characteristics, strengths, or feelings they may have and whether they may be realizations of being mad, sad, happy, or even gay. “even disavowing homosexuality is a response to it, and the response, slowly, subtly, alters who you are.” This quote perfectly captivated the effect the author has had on us throughout the beginning. As he slowly uses words to get to the subject, that is also how he walks us through the process of ones mind when realizing they are gay. Lastly, as the author attempts to convince you of the normality of being gay he starts to questions the love between homosexuals and heterosexuals. “a barrier where two lives can be maintained with some hope of success and a minimal amount of mutua embarrassment.” This is a very strong a direct quote about how the author would like to be publicly gay, he cannot do so due to societies frowning upon the act and of the rarity of it. the author implies here that it is normal too feel alone and to have the urge to isolate ones self from people because of someones ignorance.

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  24. Sidney M

    Sidney
    Keeble
    AP English
    11 April, 2013

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, “What are Homosexuals for?” he sincerely argues the fact that people need to be themselves in order to truly live. In our current society Homosexuals do not get to live as freely as heterosexuals although equal and are left to cover who they truly are with something they are not. In doing this, they rid themselves of emotion and affection in order to fit in among the heterosexual crowds. Unfortunately this can affect them in the long run.“It also leads to devastating loneliness” (380) They don’t allow themselves to rejoice in the same rights the heteros do such as making friends like them, or even finding a partner.Sullivan goes on to explain his point with the example of his professor, who had finally lived the life he was content with, “He had at least tasted a few years of his life. He had regained himself, before he lost himself forever.”(381) After his quality of life changes, Sullivan could still content himself with the thought that the professor had died happy, proudly in his own skin.
    As any other human being, all want the ability to reproduce but unfortunately not everyone can. As a relief to the problem, “They can transfer their absent parental instinct into broader parental roles” continuing on listing possible jobs and duties among the community.”(389) Because the gay/lesbian community can not always have children of their own, they find other ways to help live out a dream they would otherwise be able to have.Its a part of that happy life they want and deserve just as much as the heterosexuals do.In attempt to trying to be themselves they push their effort where they can. Through this essay Sullivan describes the life of the LGBTQ community and how they face losing themselves to impress society and find where they belong.

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  25. Haley R.

    Haley R.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English per.2
    11 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in the essay “What Are Homosexuals For?” is that homosexuals have to deal with more descrimination and outside judgement than heterosexuals because they are “different”. Sullivan states, “Even disavowing homosexuality is a response to it; and the response slowly subtly alters who you are.” The idea of changing who you really are in order to be accepted seems to be normal for people, but when you are changing yourself completely to someone you knowbin your heart are not, you have become out of reach from your natural being. By disavoying who you really are, you are saying that it is not okay for you to be yourself. Who is to say that? Sullivan mentions a “university figure” that “realized at that monent that there was no honesty at the core of his life, and no love at its center.” Sullivans friend was also a homosexual; with this said, he was ashamed of who he was and could not live his life out with love and happiness as one should. Sullivan seemed to learn to deal with the discrimination as on pg. 387 He portrays, ” The experience of growing up profoundly different in emotional and psychological makeup inevitably alters a person’s self perception.” Sullivan did not choose his sexuality, he was born with it, and grew up learning how to deal with it through the struggles that came along.

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  26. Brittany-Ann D.

    Brittany-Ann V. Dela Cruz
    Keeble
    AP English 2013
    12 April 2013

    In his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For”, Andrew Sullivan argues Homosexuals will never be able to live the life of a straight person. He asserts that no matter if the Homosexual has come out to the world and the world accepts; he or she will still feel and be judged as different. Sullivan stated, “This need not mean, as some have historically claimed, that homosexuals have no state in the sustenance of a society, but rather that their role is somewhat different…” (391). He concludes homosexuals are simply different from everyone else. Homosexuals will never be able to break though to society and be a part of the status quo. To show homosexuals are different, he
    states, “I suppose we all understood that somewhere he was homosexual; he had a few women friends, no emotion, or sexual life to speak of” (381). This shows homosexuals are criticized for being who they are. Homosexuals cannot live a ‘normal life’ because others automatically view them as lonely, abstinent, and lifeless. Sullivan also says, “AIDS has only added a bitter twist to this state of affairs, … straight peers… engaged in business of births… I am largely engaged in business of deaths” (385). Sullivan implies that homosexuals cannot even experience sex with pleasure and having a baby, but the famine of AIDS. Throughout his essay, Sullivan provides evidence to prove homosexuals will never be able to live the life of a straight person.

    Reply
  27. Gonzalo Haro

    Gonzalo Haro

    Andrew Sullivan’s essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” is that homosexuals have a greater difficulty with trying to find their place in society and face many challenges along the way. Sullivan states, “heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary emotional goal for your peers; and yet you know this cannot be your fate” (pg. 381). This statement places the reader into a homosexual’s viewpoint so they can see that they face many challenges in finding their place and trying to assume a role in society that fits them. “…they die among friends who have become their new families; they die surrounded by young death, and by the arch symbols of cultural otherness” (pg. 383). Sullivan expresses that among the challenges that homosexuals face, death from HIV and the search for an accepting second family are two big ones that have grave consequences on the LGBT community. “Growing up homosexual was to grow up normally but displaced…; to seek a gradual self-awakening, but in secret, not in public” (pg.383). Sullivan’s expression of a homosexual growing-up sheds light on the internal challenges and frustrations that adolescents and children face which affects their life on an extremely personal level. Sullivan’s essay expresses the challenges homosexuals face while trying to find a place in society that’s right for them.

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  28. Alexia George (Period 1)

    In his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” Andrew Sullivan ultimately defends homosexuality and gay marriage by sharing his and others’ experiences in life being gay. He describes the relationship between homosexuals and heterosexuals as it is viewed in present day. Sullivan supports his claim by expressing the discrimination gays face, speaking of their “easier way of life”, and showing how they are no less of a human that a heterosexual.
    Sullivan argues gays never truly live life without being discriminated or judged like heterosexuals do. He first begins to tell about professor, who was gay but had a difficult time with living that way until near end. Sullivan says “But at his funeral, I couldn’t help but reflect that he had a least tasted a few years of life,” (pg. 381) to show the professor finally felt comfortable enduring the genuinely gay life. This man did not deserve to die shortly after he stopped hiding his true identity for the outside.
    That professor was not the only one hiding though. Sullivan suggests “So many homosexuals find it essential to move away from where they are before they can remain themselves,” (pg. 382) because it is the easier way out. It is a natural instinct to keep life simple, but is running from a problem really the best resolution? This exposes the true difficulties homosexuals faced living the same, human life.
    Sullivan effectively shows how gays benefit the world. He explains how “They can transfer their absent parental instincts into broader parental roles…One of their crucial roles in society has also often been in the military,” (pg 289) which positively effects the community. Unfortunately, our society does not take this matter into consideration. They worry too much about the fact that two men are kissing, rather than how they shape our “united” nation.
    In conclusion, Sullivan believes it is not fair to let inconsideration and ignorance make a homosexual feel inferior to the human race.

    Reply
  29. Amacalli Duran

    Amacalli Duran
    Ms. Keeble
    AP ENGLISH
    12 April 2013

    In his essay, “What are Homosexuals For?” Andrew Sullivan argues that society’s preference towards heterosexual relationships formed the secretiveness of homosexual relationships, thus playing a distinctive role on their emotions. Sullivan uses multiple experiences to describe how fragility of emotions alters the typical homosexual. He states, “The sublimation of sexual longing, can create a particular form of alienated person: a more ferocious perfectionist, a cranky individual, an extremely brittle emotionalist, an ideological fanatic” (380). The stress placed on homosexual individuals to conform to society’s standards leaves them in a disarrayed state arguing between religious morals and personal beliefs. Sullivan’s, similar to many other homosexuals, attempts to compromise to the preferred standpoint, which forced him to compromise his individuality. This resulted into the happiness usually associated with homosexuals. Their instability of emotions has caused their façade. Homosexuals are not impervious to the effect of devastating loneliness. Instead they are left without refuge in the straight man’s world, to fend against solitude.

    Reply
  30. Yarelli Lopez

    Yarelli Lopez
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English Language and Composition
    Thursday, 11 April, 2013

    Writer and lecturer, Andrew Sullivan, in his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For?” he illustrates the harshly judgments that are put on homosexuals in today’s society by using his personal experience. Sullivan states that “growing up homosexual was to grow normally but displaced; to experience romantic love, but with the wrong person; to entertain grand ambitions, but of the unacceptable sort; to seek a gradual self—awakening, but in secret, not in public” (383). Sullivan describes how it felt to grow up being a homosexual. It was almost as if he had to live in two different worlds. Many homosexuals experience disapproval of their sexual orientation and they want to live a “normal” life so that they will not be judged harshly. They live in a double world filled with lies and resentment. Sullivan mentions that, “you are caught between escape and the constant daily wrench of self-denial” (382). Sullivan states that homosexuals have to live a double life during their maturing period. They have to deny to themselves and to the society of their sexual orientation. In today’s society, gays are now “coming out of the closet” at earlier times, yet many keep their secret and come to stand in front of suicidal thoughts because of the idea that they will be heavily criticized, if they say who they really are. Sullivan explains that, “within a year, I was both privately and publicly someone who attempted little disguise of his emotional orientation” (383). Sullivan tells that he was beginning to show, who he really was. It took time to finally show to the public that he was gay. Gays tend to be scared of what their society might say about them and they try to cover their true identity. After they begin to be accepted by their loved ones, they begin to show their true selves to the public.

    Reply
  31. Ross hatlen

    Ross H
    Ms.Keeble
    period 1 Ap Eng And Composition
    11 april 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in “What Are Homosexuals For?” is that modern society being a homosexual is hard and leads to depression, because of the hardships they deal with in life. Sullivan states “all too often, they preserve the persona at the expense of the person” (380) In society Gay Americans can not be themselves because of what others think. Think leads them to become empty and depressed. He then show what it feels like to come out “like being in a black-and-white movie that suddenly converted to color”(382) Being closeted leads you to become a sad person, you no longer feel that your life has any meaning. You become a black-and-white shell of what you really are. He asserts that being in the closet become part of you. “Many homosexuals never become more open, and the skills required to survive the closet remain skills by which to earn a living” Gay men and women are forced to be in the closet, just to survive in the out side world. They can not be who they want to be. They are just someone else.

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  32. Alicia

    Alicia Oseguera
    April 11, 2013
    Ms. Keeble

    In “What are Homosexuals For?” by Andrew Sullivan he argues that people need to be themselves, need to be able to live their lives without hiding their true selves, without covering up who they are with something they are not because it will just end up killing them. Just as he explains about the professor at the university, who lived hiding who he was. Sullivan says, “Which is why I cannot forget the image of that man in a bed. He could not move. For him, there was no forward, no future to move into”(381). He is not letting nobody see who he really is he hasn’t come to terms with his inner self. Nobody sees him for who he is and is why he is slowly being killed. He also goes on to explain that homosexuals are no different from any other person by sating,” Gay people have to confront the grief and shock and mortality like anybody else. They die like all people die”(383).Homosexuals live day by day believing and seeing how people point them out. Telling them that they are different but Sullivan is saying that they are just the same as us and we as a society have to give the the chance. Not only that but Sullivan makes his reader aware of the differences but also explains that although it has been pushed for diversity to push down barriers instead stereotypes are being formed by saying, “The homosexuals emotional longings, his, his dreams are human phenomena”(386). To him all the public has to do is to stop judging and let the people be who they want to be without worrying about how they will be perceived. By allowing them to live it will make them more happier, enjoying the world around them instead of hiding who they are from people.

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  33. Jashleen Singh

    Jashleen Singh
    4/11/13

    In his essay, “What Are Homosexuals For”, Andrew Sullivan illustrates the difficulties constantly faced by the majority of homosexuals, that are not experienced by the average person. He describes how discovering you are homosexual and expressing it are both very challenging. “The discovery of one’s homosexuality is for many people the same as acting upon it.”(380) It is not shocking that many homosexuals find that expressing their sexuality is terrifying. Sullivan at one point in his life even believed that being in the closet was easier than revealing yourself to society. “I felt that the closeted homosexual was a useful creature and possibly happier than those immersed in what sometimes seems like a merciless and shallow subculture.”(381) Constant remarks, insults, and jokes are always being made about homosexuals. These make closeted homosexuals reluctant to express themselves because they know how much they would struggle trying to be accepted. While there are so many stereotypes and opinions against homosexuals, Sullivan suggests that they are still human just like everyone else. “Gay people have to confront grief and shock and mortality like anybody else. The die like all people.”(383) Society again and again fails to understand that homosexuals do experience life and tragedies like everyone else. Sullivan does an outstanding job at depicting the challenges face by man homosexuals in his essay.

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  34. Maria

    Maria
    Ms.Keeble
    AP English, Period 2
    11 April 2013

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, “What are Homosexuals for?”, he states all the hardships that homosexuals go through as they grow up, and how society tends to look at them. He says how homosexuals are looked upon differently than others in society just because their gender preferences are not the same. “Growing up homosexual was to grow up normally but displaced; to experience romantic love, but with the wrong person..” (pg.383). What he says is true because many people when they see a homosexual they see them as if they were something not normal and are doing bad by being simply themselves. People are too judgemental now at days and that leads others to grow up to be someone they are not just because they fear to be crticized and looked upon in a badly way. Just like Sullivan states, “The sublimation of sexual longing can create a particular form of alienated person..” (pg.380). Sometimes people do not realize the pain they are causing others when they criticize them, we all can judge but never realize the damage we are building up. Sullivan argues that everyone should be treated equally, and be able to get married no matter what d sexual preferences are, “I believe strongly that marriage should be made available to everyone..” (pg.391). I agree with Sullivan everyone should be able to decide for their own and express their feelings freely. They are not doing any harm to us by just expressing their feelings.

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  35. Kiloni D

    Kiloni Driskell
    11 April 2013
    AP English
    2

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in the essay “What Are Homosexuals For” is that homosexuals constantly go through hardships. Also he argues that heterosexuals are similar to homosexuals so they should be treated the same, except for being discrimated by almost every individual they come upon. Sullivan states “The recognition of this emptiness literally paralyzed him”(Pg381) Sullivan describes his friend’s death a misfortune but he is grateful that he did not lose effort of living the life he got to live. He is also explicating thst homosexual often have a sense of emptiness. In example “Your are caught between escape and the constant daily wrench of self-denial.”(Pg382). Sullivan clarifies that most heterosexuals have a difficult time coming out because they feel like no individual will never accept them. This also causes fear so most just hide and never emerge . Sullivan also states “My straight peers in their early thirties…births;… buisness of deaths.” (Pg385) Sullivan explains that same sex marriage is prohibted against the law, so it prevents homosexuals from marrying the one they love. All they can do is watch their love one go, while others have baby showers and marriages.

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  36. Diana Larios

    Diana Larios
    AP English 11
    Period: 1
    Keeble
    4/11/13
    In Andrew Sullivan’s argument, “What Are Homosexuals For?” Sullivan disputes that finding yourself and admitting your sexuality is filled with confusion and denial of your own identity. He states, “You are caught between escape and the constant self-denial.” (382) Sullivan is implying that when facing the fact that you are homosexual you become insecure and trapped, wanting to push it off in a way but that only causes you to be living a lie. It all becomes complicated you want to just ignore it and not believe it’s real. In his essay he says that you also become lonely, which would make sense because we all need love, and when in this situation it is looked upon in all the wrong places. Another thing that he states that is true and shows how different they live their lives is when he writes, ““The lack of children is something some homosexuals regard as a curse”(384), it is true that homosexuals won’t ever really know what it is like to have their own child that has their blood running through their veins. What I took from the essay was the difficulties are in facing your sexuality and how it can be intricate and puzzling.

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  37. Jonathan v

    Jonathan V
    Ms.Keeble
    period 1
    Ap Eng And Composition

    In his essay,”What are Homosexuals for?”, Andrew Sullivan depicts what living as a Homosexual is like for many who know are sure of who they are. He states, “He realized at that momment that there was no honesty at the core of his life, no love at his core”(381). This quote describes a college proffessor who had no life outside of the school. He was not happy who with he was, he decided to find himself and when he finally did it was too late. Sullivan also states, “You are caught between escape and the constant daily wrench of self denial”(382). He lets the rader know that some homosexuals do not know if to comeout and be who they really wanted. With this denial,”Heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary goal for your peers;and yet you know this can not be your fate”(381). Since the homosexuals feel different than the “normal” people, they know certain road blocks are going to fall their way, impeding them from getting rights others think are not going to fit the homosexual persona.

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  38. Johan Ocegueda

    Johan Ocegueda
    April 11, 2013
    Ms. Keeble
    Sullivan discusses the hardships and discrimination that homosexuals face in America. He brings up the things they have to go through, the things they hear, see and feel. For example, He says “But it also leads to some devastating loneliness.”(380) Sullivan argues that homosexuals are capable of many things, things normal people do, but they are still treated as if not. The fact that they are different leaves them in an ocean alone with no one really there for them. Also he says “For him, there was no forward, no future to move into.”(381) Homosexuals, never get that better day. “For every night awaits a better day” well they do not have a better day. they are always hurt physically, mentally and in any other way possible. Finally Sullivan states “To experience romantic love, but with the wrong person.”(383) Even though they are different, they have feelings, they love just like everybody else. But they have it bad because no matter what he will never be able to show the love for that person like everybody else because no one accepts it.

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  39. Zoey Madsen

    Zoey Madsen
    11 April 2013
    period 5

    In Andrew Sullivan’s essay, he accurately argued the mistreatment of homosexuals in society and the problematic affect it can have on their personal life and emotions. I be believe society does in fact project a certain image of homosexuality that may signal certain connotations to the public. I constantly here negative words to describe homosexuals in a way that is to put them down and make them feel excluded from everybody else. In his essay, Sullivan includes, “Heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary emotional goal for your peers, and yet you know this cannot be your fate.” I reacted to this quote because it has a great reflection on the beliefs not only in our local society but in society everywhere. It also proves the Constitution to be inapplicable upon homosexuals, because denying them the right to marriage is, after all, unequal. By the same token, many homosexuals are being harassed for being simply who they are because in our society it is commonly seen as wrong. We are denying people the right to a happy life with people’s illogical perceptions of what homosexuality is. Sullivan makes his point in a neat, collected, and direct manner that is easy to comprehend by his audience.

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  40. Rachael B.

    Rachael Brandt
    AP English
    Ms. Keeble, Per. 2
    11 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in the essay “What Are Homosexuals For” is that homosexuals are similar to heterosexuals despite the difference in sexual orientation and should be seen as no different than just human. He says, “They die like all people die” (Sullivan 383). Homosexuals are human and humans enevtually die. The same goes for those who are heterosexual. Both groups share the same fate and nothing different hence his statement. Sullivan also asserts, “Sometimes I wonder whether some homosexuals’ addiction to constant romance… is in fact an attempt to relive this experience, again and again” (Sullivan 382). This is true for both groups, homosexual and heterosexual. Every person craves some sort of endearment, adoration, or love. Romance is what they want to fulfill the lack of those things. If love is lost, people will go find it “again and again” to be happy. Homosexuals and heterosexuals just want to be happy. In addition, Sullivan says, “Homosexuals have created safe professions within which to hide and protect each other” (Sullivan 387). All groups do this, whether similar in race, gender, or sexuality. If one feels threatened, being in a group could make him or her feel safe. Homosexuals are no different than the rest of us. Their preference is the only difference and it should not matter because like everyone else, they are human. They want to have emotional connections. They want to be loved. Homosexuals are similar heterosexuals.

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  41. Raymond P

    In Andrew Sullivan’s narrative “What are Homosexuals For?” explains how homosexuals are treated differently that heterosexuals. He states “I remember a man, a university figure… I suppose we all understood,” (381)explains how people a closed minded and they do not believe a homosexual person is capable of doing a “normal” job. He further states, “You are caught between escape and the constant self-denial.” (382) shows how one feelings could cause complications and self doubt. Lastly, “The lack of children is something some homosexuals regard as a curse.”(384) homosexuals will not experience a real family as heterosexuals do, the only way they could receive a child is through adoption.

    Reply
  42. Areli S

    Areli S
    Ms.Keeble
    AP English, 2nd period
    April 11th, 2013

    In Andrew Sullivan’s argument, “What Are Homosexuals For?”, (1995) Sullivan argues that the path of self-revelation is one filled with complications and liberations. He states, “You are caught between escape and the constant self-denial.” (382) Sullivan is trying to get to the reader the message that being one self’s truly can cause one to stumble upon complicated emotions. As a homosexual, Sullivan has a dilemma in which he and other homosexuals often feel trapped. Sullivan also reflects on how liberating it can be to reveal his true self, ” The richness of experience felt possible for the first time…….. mysterious pleasure of being human.” (382)This reinforces the stance in which revelation can lead to a feel of liberation to be one self, and it can ultimately change the person. And finally, Sullivan says, ” The experience of growing up profoundly different…… more self conscious and perhaps more reflective.” (387) All these examples, suggest that this path is one of learning and filled with complications but also liberations to be you in todays culture.

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  43. Natasha R.

    Natasha R.
    Ap English
    Keeble
    Period 5
    11 April 2013

    In Andrew Sullivan’s narrative,“What are Homosexuals For?”Sullivan discusses how homosexuals are treated and how difficult it is for them to fit into society.At first Sullivan recalls a man he met who was a university figure. The man then tells Sullivan that there was a moment that he couldn’t continue the way he was living. “He set about re-ordering his life; in his late middle age, he was having adolescent affairs;he declared his sexuality loudly and somewhat crudely to anyone who could hear; he unloaded himself to his friends and loved ones.” (381)Sullivan sees this man as a lucky person because he was able to announce his idenity without problems.After not being able to show his trueself to the world, the man is trying to make up for the lost time in his youth, This happens to alot of people who aren’t comfortable with their idenity.At one point in theri lives they feel that they can’t hide who they are.Next the author brings up his easy life after migrating to the U.S.” So many homo sexuals find it essential to move away from where they are before they can regain themsleves.”(382)In this aspect not only homosexuals suffer from exlusion,therefore leaving. Though,it is more common among them because they don’t safe around their communites and familes.They go out in search of communites that are more accepting and welcoming to them. Lastly, Sullivan states how homosexuals shouldn’t be discriminated because of who they are, instead they should the rights as hetrosexuals.“As I’ve just argued, I believe strongly that marriage should be made available to everyone, in a politics of strict public neutrality.”(391)Here it is stated that they are treated as differnt beings just because of who they love.They can’t marry due to the fact that society seems them as odd, which by definition is dicrimination.

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  44. Jessica A

    Jessica A.
    Period 5

    In writer Andrew Sullivan’s non-fiction narrative, “What are Homosexuals For?” Sullivan argues that homosexuality is a process in which the individual adapts to his or her sexuality. For example, he begins his essay with, “The discovery…upon it.” (380) Sullivan depicts that despite an individual’s knowledge of their homosexuality, he or she may act in ways the deny it. Furthermore, Sullivan asserts that, “Others…dreadful epiphanies.” (381) Sullivan conveys the message that some find it more difficult than others to decipher their sexuality. Lastly, Sullivan states, “the experience…reflective.” (387) Sullivan portrays that growing up a homosexual can alter the way you are perceived by others, and the way you perceive yourself.

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  45. Rachel N.

    Rachel N.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English Language & Composition
    12 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in “What Are Homosexuals For?” is how even though homosexuals identity may be different than the majority of our culture, we should still embrace them without judgement. The author argues his claim by providing personal experiences from his own life and offering his own insight to shed more light. The author writes, “Heterosexual marriage is perceived as the primary emotional goal for your peers; and yet you know this cannot be your fate. It terrifies and alarms you.” (381) Sullivan gives us this concrete detail into his life so that we can have empathy for people who have to struggle within society for being homosexual. Moreover, this helps the audience to get an idea that homosexuals are people with feelings prompting them to believe that they should be treated equally. In fact, Sullivan writes, “They contain the truth that order is in fact a euphemism for disorder; that problems are often more sanely enjoyed than solved; that there is reason in mystery; that there is beauty in the wild flowers that grow randomly among our wheat.” (392)Sullivan argues that we need to see the beauty in people despite our differences. That even though our sexuality is different, all people can contribute something valuable to our society. Additionally the author writes, “As I’ve just argued, I believe strongly that marriage should be made available to everyone, in a politics of strict public neutrality.” (391) Sullivan illustrates that equality should not apply to a certain group of people, but to everyone. With growing up on the foundation of shame, he wants to break that conformity and start a new beginning by making changes.

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  46. Desiree N.

    Desiree N.

    Ms. Keeble

    AP English 11

    10 April 2013

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument in “What are homosexuals for?” is that homosexuals have struggles that heterosexuals do not have and many homosexuals are stereotyped and judged by people who don’t approve of their partner preference. He says, “Heterosexual marriage is percieved as the primary emotional goal for your peers; and yet you know this cannot be your fate.” (381) Sullivan states that most homosexuals will not get married. This is due to laws against gay marriage, most people don’t approve of same-sex-marriage. Sullivan also says,” Your are caught between escape and the constant daily wrench of self-denial.”(382) Homosexuals are judged so much that most adolescent homosexuals try to hide their sex preference. People who do this feel guilty and sad that they have to hide who they really are so they distract themselves with hobbies and activities. Lastly Sullivan says, ” The lack of children is something some homosexuals regard as a curse.”(384) Gay couples wont have the same experience as heterosexual couples who have kids, the homosexual couple can adopt a kid but the couple wont be able to biologically be the parent of the child.

    Reply
  47. Alicia Gonzales

    Alicia Gonzales
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 11
    11 April 2013
    Author Sullivan’s argument is that homosexuals deal with struggles of being treated a certain way different then people that are considered normal. He states “The recognition of this emptiness literally paralyzed him…”(381) to show that homosexual people especially tend to experience these feelings. He also says “I was able from an early age, to distinguish, as my church taught, the condition of homosexuality from its practice” (380) which emphasizes the idea that the world kind of sees homosexuality as a regular thing, when in churches it isn’t really accepted.

    Reply
  48. Dartise Jones

    Dartise Jones
    4/10/13
    AP Englsh
    Ms.keeble

    Andrew Sullivan argument is that it is hard being homosexual due to you constantly being judged, and how they face hardship that mess with them mentally. The first example is “the discovery one’s homosexuality is for many people the same experience as acting upon it” PG 308. This means once you figure out your gay and except it, then you have to express your self. The next example is “sublimation of sexual longing can create a particular form of alienated person …… Ideological fanatic PG 380. Stating that most homosexuals keep them selfs away from people, or act out to hide it. This means that they are faced with a troubled child hood. The final example is “of course in a culture where homosexual remain hidden …. Would in here” PG 387. Since homosexual people been hiding their true feelings their emotional development is blocked, and it affects them mentally.

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  49. Veronica

    Veronica
    April 10, 2013
    Ms. Keeble

    Andrew Sullivan’s argument is how homosexuals are discriminated in American society and what they can offer the society. He states, “The experience of growing up profoundly different in emotional and psychological makeup inevitably alters a person’s self-perception, tends to make him or her more wary and distant, more attuned to appearance and its foibles, more self-conscious and perhaps more reflective,” (387) in order to show how homosexuals are trying to be normal and how they alter themselves in order to please society since they are not accepted. He also shares, “Childless men and women have many things to offer a society,” (389) to explain how homosexuals can play a great role in society. Lastly, Sullivan states, “But something of the gay relationship’s necessary honesty, its flexibility, its equality could undoubtedly help strengthen and inform man heterosexual bonds,” (390) in order to explain how homosexual relationships can teach others the secret to a long lasting relationship.

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