12 Feb 2013

Paragraph Two Body

Author: tashak38 | Filed under: Uncategorized

You wrote your introductory paragraph for a rhetorical analysis of “Strawberry Fields.” Now it is time to write the first body paragraph. Revisit your introduction. Choose the first strategy you named in your intro. Write a complete, well-developed body paragraph. Write your topic sentence, concrete detail (with context) then analysis, analysis, analysis. Repeat the pattern. Each body paragraph should include at least two cds and be at least eight sentences long. Get to it! It is due tomorrow morning.

72 Responses to “Paragraph Two Body”

  1. Michael Griggs Says:

    Michael Griggs
    Ms. Keeble
    3/14/13; Per. 5
    AP. English

    Eric Schlosser’s way of writing has given his readers a taste of what most migrant workers who work in strawberry fields have to go through in order to receive their pay in the job. He does this by giving statistical details in order to cause the reader to be inquisitive after thinking how unfair these jobs are. The workers have to go through a long and difficult process in order to start their job and pick the strawberries that they were prompted to do. Strawberry picking isn’t the easiest task to do, as Schlosser had described. He has tried hard to explain this difficult art that most workers have to face in order to receive pay for their families.

  2. Kiala A Says:

    Kiala Aranas
    Keeble
    AP English 11, 5th

    Schlosser provides powerful insight on the physical toll of picking strawberries in the fields with pain staking detail, and a draining tone. He uses specific diction such as “The strawberry has long been known to migrants as ‘la fruta del diablo’–the fruit of the devil.” to create a dreary connotation within the text. He advance his argument on the physical aspect of strawberry picking in the fields that causes “a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” To fill even the darkest corner of emotion in the audience with compassion, Schlosser stresses that these workers have been extremely overworked, that “There is a strong undercurrent of anxiety in a field being harvested at a piece rate. Workers move down … they pause, bend over, brush away leaves to their left and right … and move on, all in one fluid motion.” This descriptive language instills a strenuous voice when reading, as if to show the drones that the workers have become.

  3. Maliko P. Says:

    Maliko p
    2/18/13
    Period:02

    Scherlosser applies statistics, facts, and pity to demonstrate the harsh conditions immigrant famers have to go through. One example is “The strawberry has long been known to migrants as “la fruta del diablo”–the fruit of the devil.…begin the process again.” This displays the various struggles immigrant workers had to endure for very little pay. Schlosser examples show pity to immigrant and also gives people of a higher social class a different perspective of how life can be. It makes the reader more grateful for the things they have and what they don’t have.

  4. Abraham N. Says:

    Abraham N.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 11
    Period 5
    18 February 2013

    In the article, “Strawberry Fields”, author Eric Schlosser uses facts, statistics, and emotion to get his main point across in his first couple of paragraphs chronicling the work of migrant workers who get paid a very low amount by showing statistics of how much workers get paid. The display of facts in the paragraph inform the reader of the difficult things migrant workers accomplish to have a living and feed their families. After giving examples on why the job is one of the lowest paying, Schlosser also gave examples on how it is the hardest work in the fields. Schlosser uses intricate detail to describe strawberries to the readers, even to the point of calling the fruit, “la fruta del diablo”, or the fruit of the devil. Schlosser also gives the strawberry plant a detailed description, saying that they, “are four or five inches tall and grow from beds eight to twelve inches high” (4), which is a big reason why the job is so difficult for migrant workers because they have to bend down to obtain it, which causes a stiff back, which leaves possible major back problems in the future for the workers. Schlosser gives more background on the strawberry plant and how hard it is to pick for the workers, which increases emotion towards on the reader side because the quote shows a little detail on how much they have to bend over to actually pick the fruit. Schlosser uses the readers emotions when he says that, “Migrants routinely pay $100 to $200 a month to sleep in a garage with anywhere from four to ten other people.” (4) This was said to make the reader feel somewhat sorry for the migrant workers for all the hard work they continuously preform.

  5. Joelynn D. Says:

    Joelynn D.

    Ms. Keeble

    AP English – 2nd period

    18 February 2013

    For those who have never experienced the harsh conditions of working in the strawberry fields, Eric Schlosser exploits the readers’ feelings of pity and guilt with actual experiences in order to emphasize the different lifestyles between upper/middle classes and the field workers. For example, working in the fields means that one has to constantly bend over to pick the strawberries and, “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities. Most strawberry pickers suffer back pain.” By specifically explaining one of the hardships of working in the fields, Schlosser evokes the reader’s feelings and allows them to visualize how the migrant workers may have felt.

  6. Maria Says:

    Maria M.
    AP English
    Period 1

    In “Strawberry Fields,” Schlosser, uses logos towards the field workers. The author wants the readers to acknowledge all these facts so that the reader can feel an emotional appeal towards them. The author says, “A migrant often does not know how long the workday will last or what the rate will be until he or she arrives at the field that morning.” Schlosser uses logos such as this quote to makes us the readers feel bad about how the workers are being treated and all the suffering they are going through. It creates a personal feeling that makes the reader analyze thoroughly the situation thinking that there are many people out there that truly are suffering and yet others are still complaining about their lives when everything is perfectly fine. It is those types of essays that make the readers really think and analyse everything step by step.

  7. Amacalli Duran Says:

    Amacalli Duran
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English

    Schlosser uses facts and statistics to demonstrate to the middle and upper class real examples of the term struggle. Struggle, which is a foreign concept to most individuals of middle and upper classes, embodies and summarizes the life of a migrant. He mainly focuses on the pay of a migrant worker and encloses to his readers that, “…three or four will earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between” (4). One’s salary is what determines their class in society. Schlosser considers it imperative to disclose the salary of migrant workers, because others are not familiar and comfortable to such low numbers. Schlosser hopes for others to pity the workers because they are incapable of buying vital materials or the material possessions society is infatuated with. Not only does Schlosser focus on the economic struggle of migrants, but also the physical toil that comes with being one. He informs the reader that, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities” (4). Manual labor is valued by higher classes because it is what allows food in markets and consumerist items in stores. Unfortunately, the higher classes are oblivious to what their demands cause. Schlosser emphasizes to higher classes that being able to buy their demands with such ease comes with a consequence, the suffering of another. Schlosser hopes to gain sympathy from others after they come to the realization that the tedious work migrants must endure is for their benefit. Using data, Schlosser is able to appeal to empathy by asserting that migrants are not blessed with a simple life like others.

  8. Alicia Gonzales Says:

    Alicia Gonzales
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 11
    16 February 2013
    In “Stawberry Field’s” it explains greatly how even thought immigrants had a job, it was not a reliable one. They were never guaranteed security in terms of payment and hours.
    According to the article, Schlosser exclaimed, “There is no contract, no seniority, no obligation beyond the day-to-day. A grower hires and fires workers as necessary, without need for explanation. It makes no difference whether the migrant has been an employee for six days or six years. The terms of employment are laid down on a daily basis. If a grower wants slow and careful work, wages are paid by the hour. If a grower wants berries quickly removed from the field, the wages are piece-rate, providing an incentive to move fast. A migrant often does not know how long the workday will last or what the wage rate will be until he or she arrives at the field that morning” (4). Clearly this puts immigrants in a tough predicament, never knowing what could happen.
    Even though immigrants are mostlikely struggling to survive due to the conditions they are inhabiting with their job in the strawberry fields, it seems as though they are still positive, still willing to work as the article states, “The availability of work, not the pay scale, is of greatest concern to migrants. Despite the hardships that accompany the job, there is an oversupply of people hoping to pick strawberries. The fear of unemployment haunts all farm workers in California” (4). The significance in this piece of the article is that it shows that immigrants would rather have a job, even if it is a job that is bascally unfair, because they would rather have a job then no job at all. Furthermore; it demonstrates the poverty that they must have experienced that led them to fear unemployment. They could choose to have no job, or a job that does not completely meet their needs, even if they deserve one that does.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Alicia, I need you to analyze one of the strategies Schlosser uses–start with a topic sentence that focuses on Schlosser, not the contents of the article. Revise and let me know when you have finished.

  9. Gonzalo Haro Says:

    Gonzalo Haro

    Schlosser uses descriptive imagery to appeal to the reader’s sense of empathy. In describing the conditions in which immigrants have to live in, the reader feels empathy towards them. “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities” Pg. 4, P.4. The quote makes the reader feel for what the immigrants have to go through. The average person has feelings of empathy when they hear that another person is suffering, and Schlosser knows this, which is why he uses it as his strategy to get the reader on his side of the argument. “Another constant worry is finding a place to sleep. Santa Cruz and Monterey counties have some of the highest housing costs in the country.” Pg.4, P.7. The reader is once again shown another condition in which the farmers have to live with. Not having a place to sleep is something that the average person would dread, and no one would want to be in their place.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Excellent as always, Gonzalo. Please look at the repetitive prepositions in first two sentences. Be careful. Your ideas and composition are usually so tight, be aware that you always need to proofread before publishing.

  10. Rachel N. Says:

    Rachel N.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English Language & Composition
    14 February 2013

    Schlosser first appeals to our humanistic emotions of sympathy by giving us a clear and concise perception of the working conditions migrants have to physically endure. The author writes, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities. Most strawberry pickers suffer back pain.” By providing this fact, the reader is able to feel compassion for the workers and a growing sense of empowerment that this is not right. By giving us a visual of the hardship these migrant workers experience, the audience is able to empathize with the workers and feel their pain. Moreover, because the readers are able to grasp the worker’s pain, it sews together the logic that something must be done about this iniquitous treatment. Also, since the author unveils that the effects of bending your back frequently are comprehensive, we are able to fathom that this is not their fault, but their body reciprocating to the current working conditions. These migrant workers have no control over these conditions, but their bosses do. By providing us with this information, the audience is aware that they have the power to change this.

  11. Caitlin H. Says:

    Caitlin Huie
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English Per 2
    14 February 2013

    Eric Schlosser describes the back-breaking labor farmers have to experience while picking strawberries, stimulating sympathy and understanding. He explains that, “Picking strawberries is some of the lowest-paid, most difficult, and therefore least desirable farm work in California.” Knowing what the pickers have to experience makes the reader feel pity. It also allows the reader to realize how intense the job is. Schlosser clarifies how “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back…weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” The disabilities they might endure while picking strawberries evokes compassion. The reader wants the workers to have better working conditions and better wages. It establishes an understanding of their strenuous conditions. These details Schlosser has in his article makes the reader feel sympathy and it gives the reader a better understanding of the pickers’ day-to-day job.

    • tashak38 Says:

      I like your topic sentence–I would, add that the “stimulating…” occurred “in the audience.” Make sure you say that the appeal is designed to appeal to the audience. Good job, Caitlin.

  12. DaJohn Wade Says:

    Schlosser discusses the the reasons and situations immigrant workers are put in and uses appeal to grasp the audiences attention. He uses logos but stating that only 12 percent of the immigrant workers can say they have year round employment (P5,PG1). This supports how position on how the conditions for immigrant workers or unfair and need to be changed. He also applies ethos when he mentions what one economist said. The quote was,”There’s nothing more permanent than temporary workers (P6, PG1).” This quote gives more emphasis to the fact that everyone from every day people to those in politics and power feel that the immigrant workers need more. Lastly, pathos is in his essay when he discusses the unfortunate struggles that the families endure day in and day out.

    • tashak38 Says:

      You are going to have to revise this DaJohn. I want you to be more careful. We are no longer using the terms, “pathos,” “logos,” or “ethos.” Redo.

  13. Phuong-My N. Says:

    Schlosser uses facts and statistics to demonstrate the struggle and hardships migrant workers have to tolerate in order to make a living. He states, “A migrant often does not know how long the workday will last or what the wage rate will be…there might be two weeks of ten-hour days followed by a week of no work at all, depending on the weather and the market,” (P.4) to show how unbalanced their job is. Migrant workers do not have a set time, place, or minimum wage! Sometimes, the workers get paid on piece rate, meaning you get paid for how many strawberries you pick. This is awful for the workers because they have to rush and run and causes there to be “…a strong undercurrent of anxiety in a field being harvested at a piece rate.” (P.4) Workers are stressing because if they do not work fast, they do not get paid and back pain occurs to many migrants because of the constant, rushed, strawberry picking. Since Southern California is so close to Mexico, the migrant workers get paid even less than other states. It is possible for them to get lucky and be paid $100 a day, but that is rare. “When a crew of thirty picks at a piece rate, three or four will earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” (P.4) Workers can make $4.25 an hour. Just $4.25 an hour for all their harsh, brutal, and backbreaking work. Schlosser wants people to view the life of a migrant worker through their eyes and see how a delicious fruit can be so evil.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Be sure to not get too much into details about the article, but rather analyze how Schlosser engages his audience. You do an excellent job integrating quotes and your writing is almost flawless. Good job, Phong-My!

  14. Kiana Ledda Says:

    Kiana Ledda
    Keeble
    AP English, Period 5
    13, February 2013

    Schlosser introduces the audience to the hardships that Latino immigrants suffer from in order to stimulate realization and sympathy. He collects sufficient data from the workers in the strawberry fields to have readers realize that they will do anything in order to provide for themselves. Schlosser explains, “…three or four will earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” Further into his article, Schlosser highlights the type of pain that the workers have to endure for many hours while picking the strawberries. He states, “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” He then evokes the audience’s emotion of sympathy by describing the work in the field as, “… holding a pen or an old minimum-security prison.” Schlosser wants to stress out how much the workers desperately need their jobs in order to survive regardless of the harsh conditions they must endure.

  15. Merritt Walker Says:

    Merritt Walker
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 2
    13 February 2013

    Eric Schossler describes the hardships and conditions of the immigrant laborers working in the strawberry fields. A lot of the laborers were homeless or living in terrible conditions. “…emerging from small houses, backyard sheds, basements, and garages where they spent the night.” “…two young men rode bicycles; most likely slept outside.” People who are working should not have to live like this. This is horrible; no one wants to live in a shed or live in a garage, no one should have to, but those are the only places these people can call home. These workers are taken advantage of because majority of them are illegal, and can’t complain. Even though they come from a different country they should not be treated like this, they should be treated like any other worker. If anything these people work a lot harder than other people who get paid four times the amount they do. Migrant workers work for long periods of time with little pay. “Migrants are the poorest workers of the United States…earns about $5,000 a year for twenty-five weeks of farm work.” This is nothing! No one can live on $5,000 for the whole year, especially not with a family. Since the average worker makes about $5,000 a year, a lot of them go into debt because the cost of living is too expensive. This system screws the migrants over because they will not be able to get out of debt.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Merritt, this is well organized and thoughtful, but it must analyze how Schlosser’s descriptions influence the audience’s perceptions and emotions.
      Revise.

  16. Ryan C. Says:

    Ryan C.
    Ms. Keeble
    Period 1

    Schlosser brings you to the conditions of a migrant farm worker with the use of descriptive detail. He writes that, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” Writing this will give the reader one of the most important conditions that affect the migrant workers. With the use of powerful words like excruciating and lifelong, the reader can imagine how horrible and difficult it is to pick strawberries. Therefore the reader will have a more sorrow feeling towards strawberry pickers and appreciate the work the pickers do to get strawberries to markets. Also with the description of the hours the worker’s work, the reader can connect their daily life to farm workers, furthermore pushing out the authors purpose. Schlosser writes that, “The few remaining labor camps for single men are grim places. Campo El Toro, a group of whitewashed buildings surrounded by chain-link fences and barbed wire, desolate except for a rosebush in front of the manager’s office, looks like a holding pen or an old minimum-security prison. The Englund labor camp is reputed to be one of the best of its kind. Inside the barracks the walls are freshly painted and the concrete floor is clean. A typical room is roughly twelve feet by ten feet, unheated, and occupied by four men. Sheets of plywood separate the steel cots.” With this description of the conditions of a labor camp, the reader may think living in a labor camp there is extravagant, but he follows up with what migrant works prefer. He states, “Migrant workers try to avoid the labor camps for reasons other than cost: the risks of having possessions stolen during the day and of sleeping beside strangers at night. Whenever possible, migrants stay in residential neighborhoods. They pool their resources, relying on relatives and friends.”
    With the well rounded description of reasons why residential housing is better, like the height of the room, risks, occupation, and looks; the reader can furthermore understand what these workers have to go through. With all the descriptions, it creates a level of thought that connects to the purpose.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Ryan, shorten your quotes with ellipses “…” and instead of using verb phrases like “brings you” “give the reader” use active verbs–creates for the audience, evokes in the audience (makes them feel)–use strong verbs. Didn’t I give you a list of active verbs to use?

  17. Brenda C. Says:

    Brenda C
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English, Per 5
    13 February 2013
    Schlosser appeals to the audience’s side of sympathy when he mentions,”One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit.. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” All the pain strawberry pickers go through is not worth it when you look at the amount of money they make in those long exhausting hours of bending down and picking those fruits we love to eat. Immigrants have no other choice left, but to pick strawberries to make the little money that would at least help them bring bread to their table. Also a lot of immigrant workers have a family to take care of and provide with food and anything they need, that is why they have to sacrifice so much of their health, time, and family time. Throughout the article Schlosser points out many other hardships strawberry pickers, or in general immigrant workers go through on a daily basis and appeals to the readers side of empathy.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Thanks Brenda. Your organization is well thought out and purposeful. I need you to go back and revise–your ellipsis should contain three dots, and how can you make the “audience’s side of sympathy” more functional? I see some unnecessary words. Also, remember the colloquialism, “what they go through.” How about using a more academic phrase, “experience?”

  18. Dominique N Says:

    Schlosser uses factual data to emphasize the struggles of immigrant laborers. The laborers are awarded little for all the hard work they do. Schlosser states “When a crew of thirty picks at a piece rate, three or four with earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” (4) This information is appalling, but was not surprising. The amount of pay some of these workers are unrealistic to live off of, and it is ridiculous how it is only some of the laborers as well. Why must only three or four people out of thirty who do they exact same amount of work get the normal pay and the rest get less? This kind of treatment is illegal to our American workers in any state in the US (to my knowledge), so why should immigrants who work much harder and longer than we do be treated like this? Another detail found in the article also supported how these laborers are treated. “A typical room is roughly twelve feet by ten feet, unheated, and occupied by four men. Sheets of plywood separate the steel cots.” (4) This is completely ridiculous, unsanitary, and inhumane. Even animals are treated better than this! No human should have to ever to share a room that small with three other people. The living space is impossible, it’s a shame of why the government did not step in and stop this. Just because these people came from a different country does not mean they should be treated less equal than any other person who happened to have the privilege of being born here. If they do the same work, they should be rewarded the same way.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Dominique, you must analyze how his strategy affects the audience–your commenting on the workers conditions, which is good, but what made you think and feel that way? Schlosser influenced you as a reader. It’s your job to discuss how. Revise.

  19. Jhoann B. Says:

    Jhoann B.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP Eng 11 Per. 2
    13 February 2013

    Schlosser exhibits the strenuous duties migrant laborers are compelled to endure while working on strawberry fields, evoking concern and sympathy. Most people are unaware of the tribulations strawberry field workers undergo; however, Schlosser’s eye-opening article makes readers cognizant of how physically demanding strawberry picking actually is. He details, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” Schlosser further reveals that “five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour; and the rest will earn something in between.” Being paid such a low amount of money for working so hard on strawberry fields is an injustice that needs to be addressed. Strawberry field workers deserve to be paid a higher wage for the hours they spend monotonously picking strawberries with their backs bent over. They have to make a living in order to feed their families, just like everyone else. For most of us, it is only imaginable how hard life must be for migrant workers barely living off of their meager wages from picking strawberries. We must acknowledge the pain these laborers forbear in providing us with the sweetness of California’s strawberries and pursue the manifestation of better working conditions in the agricultural industry.

  20. Kiloni D Says:

    Kiloni Driskell
    13 February 2013
    AP English
    2

    Eric Schossler describes the atrocious conditions of the migrant workers in the strawberry fields. He states, “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” Schlosser wants his audience to understand the pain, the hardship, and the suffer that creeps upon them on the daily bases to get the money they need. Plus, Migrant workers go through a struggle to avoid labor camps. He states, “the free market always seeks a work force that is hungry, desperate, and cheap–a work force that is anything but free.” Schlosser’s purpose was to notify his audience that the market does not care about the workers but only care about the merchandise that satisfies the buyer. Schlosser also wants his audience to acknowledge the hard work of migrant workers, picking the red fruit that we love to devour.

  21. Desiree N. Says:

    Desiree N.
    Period 5
    Feb. 13, 2013

    Schlosser uses sympathy to make the reader connect with his article. Using the reader’s emotions makes the reader take pity for the migrants instead of being distant and uncaring. Schlosser claims, “Picking strawberries is some of the lowest paid, most difficult, and therefore least desirable farm work in California.” tells the reader that this is the last resort for the migrants to provide for themselves and family, they will do anything for their family. He says,” workers were found living in orchards and irrigation ditches.” the reader can infer that the strawberry field workers are homeless and have to sleep outside in the fields. Schlosser also writes,” bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excrutiating pain and lifelong disabilities.” this shows that the migrants have to do back-breaking labor to provide for their family. Most people dislike the topic of slavery, Schlosser tries to get the most horrific details about the migrants so the reader will connect this kind of labor and treatment to slavery which makes them feel bad for these workers. The reader can connect with the migrant workers because they know what it is like to have to provide food and money for themselves and their families.

  22. Brittany-Ann D. Says:

    Brittany-Ann V. Dela Cruz
    Keeble
    AP English
    12 February 2013
    Schlosser attracts the audience’s sense of empathy by describing the horrible conditions they endure. He explains the physical and mental pains using personal experience. He reports, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit…Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” The excerpt allows the audience to understand the difficulties of a strawberry picker. It creates a sympathetic appeal to help the readers see strawberry pickers deserve better conditions for the hard work they put in.

  23. Jashleen Singh Says:

    Schlosser’ use of ethos drags the reader into his essay. By describing the unbelievable amounts of work and the unfortunate health problems that later occur in the future for these workers, he forces the reader to pity and have sympathy for them. When he states,”Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” you can realize that these migrant workers are getting disabilities from their hard work. To truly understand this situation, you have to realize these immigrants do not have insurance. Also, from working in these strawberry fields, they are not making the money necessary to pay for these injuries. These disabilities just become something that these migrant workers must live with, and this is something that the reader may sympathize the migrant workers for. Schlosser then states that these workers can possibly work up to 10 hours a day for 2 weeks, and then not work at all. These workers put in the time to make the minimal amount of money, and to then take that money away from them, is taking away anything they are working towards. It’s unfair for these workers to be put through hell, and then after a few weeks to tell them that they will no longer be working is simply cruel and heartless.

  24. Natasha R. Says:

    Natasha R.
    Keeble
    Ap English
    Period 5
    12 Febuary 2013

    Schlosser uses sympathy and facts to educate the reader. Facts are seen through out the article such as when he describes how high speciality crops are brought onto the tables of the country.”Nearly every fruit and vegetable found in the diets of health-conscious,often high-minded eaters is still picked by hand: every head of lettuce, every bunch of grapes, every avocado, peach, and plum.(pg.1,p.5) Here it is explained how difficult it is being a migrant worker. These people work in blazing heat to bring the food to other’s stomachs.Next,sympathy is seen in the article when the living conditions of the migrant workers is told. “The newest migrant workers, who lack family in the area and haven’t yet learned the ropes, often sleep outdoors, in the wooded sections of Prunedale, trespassing, moving to a different hiding place each night. A few years ago, on hillsides above the Salinas Valley, hundreds of strawberry pickers were found living in caves”(Pg. 4,p.9). It’s exhibited how the lives of wokers are,Schlosser is demonstrateing to the readers how the other half lives, which is the crop pickers.All in all, Schlosser is opening the eyes of many Americans for them to realize how streneous it is to be a migrant farm worker, as well as to be grateful that we have people like them to supply our food.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Revise. Choose one. Sympathy or facts. Then decide what kind of facts. How would you describe them? You must must must revise for active voice. Your passive voice creates confusion. Revise so I can see you know what I mean. And I say choose one because you need one strategy for your topic sentence. If you choose, discuss the other in a separate paragraph. You don’t have to say everything all at once. Let me know when you finish.

  25. Aaron C Says:

    Aaron Chon
    Ms Keeble
    AP English 11 P2
    14 February 2013

    Schlosser begins by casually describing the routine that has become the daily lives of many along a stretch of poorly cluttered structures. He elaborates upon the mornings for the people that have to make a living in the fields, from the moment that the sun breaks across the horizon. Schlosser writes “As dawn approaches, the procession of old Buicks, pickups, ancient school buses towing portable toilets, and beat-up vans heads for the neighboring fields.” From the vivid description that Schlosser provides, one can almost sense the poor state of items that have been used continuously without replacement. This leads to the conclusion that the workers have not been able to afford new items, which can be assumed to be due to insufficient wages, leading back to the work that they do. One of the more common racist stereotypes is that Hispanics are associated with field work, and though many would hope that this is one of the more ignorant assumptions from the past, this is actually not the case. Schlosser elaborates upon this point, as he muses “In the early-morning light it looks like a scene out of the distant past, the last remnant of a vanishing way of life–and yet nothing could be further from the truth.” The fact that this “way of life” is still in effect leads to the point that agricultural labor is still needed in large quantities, and there are many that can be taken advantage of to that purpose. The scenes that are described by Schlosser bring reality to the reader, who may or may not have already known about the predicament.

  26. Dominique N Says:

    Dominique N.
    AP English 11 Per 2
    Ms. Keeble
    13 February 2013

    Eric Schlosser uses factual data to emphasize the struggles of immigrant laborers. The laborers are awarded little for all the hard work they do. Schlosser states “When a crew of thirty picks at a piece rate, three or four with earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” (4) I was completely applauded at this information, but was not surprised. The amount of pay some of these workers are unrealistic to live off of, and it is ridiculous how it is only some of the laborers as well. Why must only three or four people out of thirty who do they exact same amount of work get the normal pay and the rest get less? This kind of treatment is illegal to our American workers in any state in the US (to my knowledge), so why should immigrants who work much harder and longer than we do be treated like this? Another detail found in the article also supported how these laborers are treated. “A typical room is roughly twelve feet by ten feet, unheated, and occupied by four men. Sheets of plywood separate the steel cots.” (4) This is completely ridiculous, unsanitary, and inhumane. Even animals are treated better than this! No human should have to ever to share a room that small with three other people. The living space is impossible, I don’t know why the government has not stepped in and stopped this. Just because these people came from a different country does not mean they should be treated less equal than any other person who happened to have the privilege of being born here. If they do the same work, they should be rewarded the same way.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Revise. No “I.” Just speak as if you’re an expert. You should never ever use I in an analysis. You share your opinions, but do not analyze. Let me show you: “schlosser’s facts emphasize the appalling conditions faced by farm workers. He specifically highlights the pitiful amount of money earned by the laborers who stoop all day sometimes…

      You have to revise and look up “applauded.” Be careful Dominique.

  27. Tanzeel H. Says:

    Tanzeel Hak
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English, Period 2
    12 February 2013

    Schlosser grasps the readers’ hearts by explaining the mental and physical pain these farmers go through while working at the strawberry fields. He states, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” This gives the reader an understanding of what one must endure just for us to enjoy strawberries. For us to devour these red fruits someone has to spend hours on end picking them. This is painless for us, but forever painful for these farmers. They spend the rest of their lives suffering just to receive the money they need. Schlosser reveals that,“There is no contract, no seniority, no obligation beyond the day-to-day. A grower hires and fires workers as necessary, without need for explanation. It makes no difference whether the migrant has been an employee for six days or six years. The terms of employment are laid down on a daily basis.” These farmers have no job security, today they can be strawberry pickers and by tomorrow be begging for change. The farmers only make enough to make ends meet they can’t save money for “just in case scenarios.” If they have kids or relatives that are relying on them to buy food or have a shelter, it can all disappear within a blink of an eye.

  28. Rachael B. Says:

    Rachael B.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 11, Per. 2
    13 February 2013

    Schlosser describes the unfair labor trade as he tells about the realities of the franchise. He closely examines what workers and bosses get out of the franchise. Weather plays a strong role, determining if farmers/laborers are going to expect a pay cut or no pay at all. These workers stress through harvest and worry about the weather factor to make a buck, only to find the strawberries may be destroyed or unable to be sold. Owners do not care if such elements causes the worker to not receive money as long as they do not lose earnings. This allows the franchise to save lost money from dead crops while the poor laborer is deprived of a necessity. As most businesses do, owners of these field look for ways to cut prices for the consumer as well as boost production without losing profit. They cut the paycheck of the worker so that we, the consumer, can easily purchase it. Strawberries vary in price according to Schlosser and a pound could go for as low as twenty-five cents. If each pound is sold this way, what sort of money could the laborer expect out of this? Field owners take the highest percentage of that and trickle the rest to the worker. They are expected to live off of that sort of money. This inequitable division of money highlights the unfair labor trade of money for work. Such factors cause farmers to work feverishly and constantly to survive off the little money they are given.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Revise Rachel. You are summarizing the essay. Your job is to analyze the strategies. You began to do so at the end of the paragraph, but what about at the beginning of the paragraph? You should have a balance of concrete detail, commentary, commentary– but your commentary should focus on the effect of Schlosser’s strategy. Why does he include this information about strawberry farming. What is he trying to evoke in his audience?

      • Rachael B. Says:

        Rachael B.
        Revision.

        Schlosser describes the unfair labor trade as he tells about the realities of the franchise. These workers stress through harvest and worry about the weather factor to make a buck, only to find the strawberries may be destroyed or unable to be sold. As most businesses do, owners of these field look for ways to cut prices for the consumer as well as boost production without losing profit. They cut the paycheck of the worker so that we, the consumer, can easily purchase it. Strawberries vary in price according to Schlosser and a pound could go for as low as twenty-five cents. If each pound is sold this way, what sort of money could the laborer expect out of this? They are expected to live off of that short supply of money. The consumer realizes this inequitable division of money highlights the unfair labor trade of money for work. Such factors cause farmers to work feverishly and constantly to survive off the little money they are given. Consumers are left shocked knowing that migrant workers are treated with little consideration and feel the utmost sympathetic for them. These people work hard so that the buyer does not have. Schlosser evokes this feeling by explaining the laborers’ hardships with payment so that perhaps consumers are driven to change the unfairness and inequality of work and money. They come to better their lives through work and good pay, not keep it at a minimal standard in which they would never have the chance to climb the social ladder.

  29. Zoey Madsen Says:

    Zoey
    period 5
    13 February 2013

    Schlosser describes the difficult situations migrant workers experience using factual evidence to educate the reader and contain credibility upon writing. “Migrants are among the poorest workers in the United States. The average migrant worker is a twenty-eight-year-old male, born in Mexico, who earns about $5,000 a year for twenty-five weeks of farm work.” This information Schlosser gives influences the audience to a sympathetic response and connects them to the migrant workers on a more personal level. Schlosser uses formal writing with an aware tone to provide education of migrant workers and the work done to maintain the distribution and continuation of the strawberry. Schlosser also emphasizes the huge impacts working have on peoples lives, how important working in the fields truly is to migrant workers, and how dependent they are upon it.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Zoey, just say what you need to say plainly. You do not need to say anything fancy, your job for this class is to make sure you write academically accurate sentences. So when if you create sentences like “contain credibility upon writing” your reader is confused. What does that mean exactly? Please revise. Make that sentence make sense. Let me know when you’re done. :). Thanks Honey.

  30. Alexis l. Says:

    Alexis l.
    Ms. Keeble
    Ape English 11
    2/13/13
    Eric Schossler emphasizes the physical strain and the measly pay that migrant work receive everyday. Schlosser reveals the poor working conditions that these workers have to endure. Schlosser describes these conditions like,” looks like a holding pen or an old minimum-security prison.”(pg4,P8). These migrant can’t look forward to a good nights rest because they don’t have the luxury of sleeping in a well made bed. A regular person that works the same amount of hours but with more pay and less strain would never succumb to those conditions, but these migrant workers don’t have the option to say no they can only accept and be grateful. ” Most strawberry pickers suffer back pain.”(pg4,P4). The workers endure pain on a daily basis, but still have to keep working or else they’ll lose the job to another more able bodied migrant worker. The workers can’t simply call in sick because they know their boss can easily say ” Well it’s been nice knowing.” and fire them. Migrant workers can never take a break or relax, they always fear the possibility of being replaced.

  31. Areli S Says:

    Areli S
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English 2
    February 12th 2013

    Schlosser uses factual data to emphasize the reality of this issue. He attempts to reach to his audience through that of data regarding payment. In his informative essay he brings up that immigrant and migrant workers are greatly underpaid, “Migrants are among the poorest workers in the United States. The average migrant worker is a twenty-eight-year-old male, born in Mexico, who earns about $5,000 a year for twenty-five weeks of farm work. His life expectancy is ..” Schlosser uses his data to spark up emotional distress upon those who feel strong about immigrant workers as well. He is able to open many eyes with this statement. To live off of this minimal amount of money is troublesome, especially here in the United States. To know that these people are over working without extra payment angers me. But its much more frighting to see that big farmers take advantage of workers and “reward” them with a minuscule amount of money. One wonders if their underpayment is moralistic on behalf of the selfish rich farmer. To be doing a dangerous job and not being paid sufficiently for risking ones well being is unbelievable, but what is there to do ? What is there to do , when an immigrant can’t defend oneself?

  32. David D. Says:

    David Delgado
    Ms. Keeble
    Period 2
    AP English
    12 February 2013
    Schlosser describes how the migrant workers don’t get paid enough for there work. In this quote “…three or four will earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” (page 4, paragraph 5) Being payed less than minimum is a horrible pay for these workers. The farmers to very hard work out on the field when picking strawberries. It is not as easy as it seems because farmers had to be delicate with the strawberries and there was also a lot to pick. There boss is taking advantage of them by paying them below minimum wage, they are almost working for free. Earning four-twenty five an hour will not get much for a worker. An apartment costs a good amount of money and earning below minimum wage will not all the workers to pay for housing and food.

    • tashak38 Says:

      You are analyzing the farmworker’s conditions, which makes sense, but your job is to analyze how Schlosser engages and influences the thoughts, feelings and actions of his audience. Re-do.

  33. Oscar G. Says:

    Oscar G.
    Period 1
    Schlosser stays informative and delivers pity in his writing by giving the ugly truth about the immigrant workers in the fields to his audience. Schlosser talks about the immigrant’s living conditions in his writing, “A typical room is roughly twelve feet by ten feet, unheated, and occupied by four men. Sheets of plywood separate the steel cots. For $80.00 a week, a price that most migrants cannot afford, one gets a bed and two meals a day.”(4) Schlosser states so in his writing so that readers can see the need of success for the immigrants. So the readers can see that the immigrants are here to work, and they came here to be successful. Although their lives on this side of the border are unsuitable to their effort they are still here! Schlosser goes on to state, Most strawberry pickers suffer back pain. As would be expected, the older one gets, the more one’s back hurts. Farm workers, like athletes, also decline in speed as they get older.”(4) With such assertion that a body can only withstand so much physical damage before it just gives out. The field workers are one of the people that can get damaged from one day to the next. With them knowing that they can get seriously hurt, they still go out everyday and work one hundred and ten percent just so they can be allowed to work the next day. After Schlosser provided such information his audience is left none the less awed.

  34. Caleb M. Says:

    Caleb M.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English, Per. 2
    12 February 2013

    Schlosser uses the appeals logos and pathos to help the reader understand the physical pain and financial stress that migrant workers must overcome from working in the strawberry fields. Schlosser states “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit…Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” This form of logos gives the reader actual facts about the strenuous work that migrants do on a daily basis for months or even years. Also, Schlosser explains how working in the fields for a short time can lead to lifelong injuries for the rest of the workers lives. In the following paragraphs, Schlosser describes the financial difficulties for migrant strawberry field workers. He states facts such as “The availability of work, not the pay scale, is of greatest concern to migrants” and “Another constant worry [for migrants] is finding a place to sleep”. The reader is then enveloped in a wave of facts that describe how difficult it is for migrants to make a decent living. These descriptions aid in Schlosser reaching his purpose.

    • tashak38 Says:

      Revise. You cannot use the terms pathos, log, or ethos anymore.

      • Caleb M. Says:

        Schlosser describes the hardships that migrant workers have to experience to help the reader understand the physical pain and financial stress they must overcome from working in the strawberry fields. Schlosser states “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit…Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” This gives the reader actual facts about the strenuous work that migrants do on a daily basis for months or even years. Also, Schlosser explains how working in the fields for a short time can lead to lifelong injuries for the rest of the workers lives. In the following paragraphs, Schlosser describes the financial difficulties for migrant strawberry field workers. He states facts such as “The availability of work, not the pay scale, is of greatest concern to migrants” and “Another constant worry [for migrants] is finding a place to sleep”. The reader is then enveloped in a wave of facts that describe how difficult it is for migrants to make a decent living. These descriptions aid in Schlosser reaching his purpose.

  35. Alexia G. (period 1) Says:

    Schlosser explains how the strawberry system works physically and economically. He illustrates workers bent over for hours brushing through the leaves for berries. Even with all this dirty work pay is not always guaranteed; it depends on the boss. “If a grower wants… at the field that morning,” (para 1). Many do not realize this is not an easy job. Simply picking strawberries can easily become forever lower back pain. Strawberry picking is also a horrible job because you will never know whether you still have the job tomorrow. It goes beyond the physical pain, but this job can swallow your emotions. Schlosser’s thought to describe this torturing job makes America realize that working at McDonald’s is not as bad as it sounds.

  36. Thomas T Says:

    Thomas T
    Keeble
    Period 1
    Schlosser attempts to grab the reader’s attention by stating the hardships that these migrant workers face on a frequent schedule. He appeals to his audience’s pathos by using imagery and facts along with the reader’s sense of morals to support his article. He describes the strawberry picker having to “bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities.” Schlosser’s use logic coupled with using the reader’s sense of morals achieves his purpose in having the reader see what it is these people do and hopefully have them see his point of view. Schlosser uses statistics to imagine such an unbearable task as “when a crew of thirty picks at a piece rate, three or four will earn $10.00 an hour, five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between.” Schlosser puts the reader in the worker’s point of view: working on a painstaking task just to earn a small amount.

  37. Sidney Says:

    Sidney
    AP English
    12 February 2013
    In “Strawberry Fields” Schlosser uses his power of words to help the readers imagine what is going on in the lives of immigrants. “Campo El Toro, a group of whitewashed buildings surrounded by chain-link fences and barbed wire, desolate except for a rosebush in front of the manager’s office, looks like a holding pen or an old minimum-security prison. The England labor camp is reputed to be one of the best of its kind. Inside the barracks the walls are freshly painted and the concrete floor is clean. A typical room is roughly twelve feet by ten feet, unheated, and occupied by four men. Sheets of plywood separate the steel cots. For $80.00 a week, a price that most migrants cannot afford, one gets a bed and two meals a day. I have seen nicer horse barns.” Schlosser’s description of designated homes for immigrants proves the horrible circumstances they are in. If they are living in an UN-home like place for that much a week, how can they afford anything else? They are offered a place similar to animals and inmates in jails. Migrants who work in the fields don’t deserve to be punished for attempting to make an honest living. Schlosser’s mixture of opinion into the text also makes it seem that like I, he cares about what he is writing. It worries him too that people are living this way. With his well thought out writing he appeals to ones ethics and emotions. If you know any one that was or is an immigrant you can understand where he is coming from and imagine it well. “Workers move down the furrows pushing small wheelbarrows; they pause, bend over, brush away leaves to their left and right, pick berries, place them in boxes, check the plants, and move on, all in one fluid motion. Once their boxes are filled, they rush to have them tallied at the end of the field, rush back, and begin the process again.” He mentions the difficulties in ways you can imagine well and feel the pain, its unfortunate that people live this way but they shouldn’t have to.

  38. Yarelli Lopez Says:

    Yarelli Lopez
    Ms. Keeble
    Ap English Language & Composition
    12 February 2013

    Schlosser explains one of the major issues among migrants, who are usually field-workers. He emphasizes on health and on how it becomes an issue to those who work for long periods of time and have to put their body in uncomfortable positions, which most of the time increase back pains. He uses examples of logos, for instance, “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities. Most strawberry pickers suffer back pain. As would be expected, the older one gets, the more one’s back hurts” (pg.4). He uses this appeal in order for him to maintain a strong argument argument for why strawberries are the “fruit of the devil”, meaning that strawberries in a way are the “forbidden fruit”. They cause many problems that are almost unable to be repaired or solved such as pain. He acknowledges that not only is the fruit “very sickening” meaning it decreases good health but also is very poorly paid to work for.

  39. Raymond P Says:

    Raymond P
    Ms. Keeble
    AP English
    12 February 2013

    Eric Schlosser’s emphasizes how harsh and terrible the conditions the workers have to face. For instance, “Migrant workers try to avoid the labor camps for reasons other than cost: the risks of having possessions stolen during the day and of sleeping beside strangers at night” (Page 4 Paragraph 9). Schlosser states, “Farm labor is more physically demanding and less financially rewarding than almost any other kind of work” (Page 4 Paragraph 15). He is pointing out that even though the workers work harder, they are still under paid. The workers could do as much as they could and still would get the same low amount because of their ethnicity. The workers have to face this constantly throughout their lives, workers would do anything in their will to get paid.

  40. Diana Larios Says:

    Diana Larios
    AP English 11
    Period: 1
    February 12, 2013

    Schlosser approaches his audience using the appeal to pathos, these migrant workers worked extreme hours to perform arduous tasks. he descriptively describes the physical strain they had to sustain. He states, “There is a strong undercurrent of anxiety in a field being harvested at a piece rate. Workers move down the furrows pushing small wheelbarrows; they pause, bend over, brush away leaves to their left and right, pick berries, place them in boxes, check the plants, and move on, all in one fluid motion,” (4). His purpose in saying so is to get the audience to feel the pain and suffering these farm workers had to endure. To be working under such fatal conditions it all lead to creating mercy in the minds and hearts of those who pushed away the issue or didn’t necessarily see it’s significance . The feeling of remorse for these workers might lead to getting the votes from those who we least expected from, which is the sole purpose of Schlosser speech. He goes on by creating a more explicit view of how these migrant farmer workers feel about they’re fulfillment with these arduous labor tasks that they complete on a daily basis. They call the strawberry “La fruta del diablo” meaning the fruit of the devil, a connection that they make because it is something that hurts them physically, pays them ridiculously low wages, makes them work extreme hours, and gives them no benefit. It’s not something they would prefer to do but it is their only choice. This makes the reader and the audience understand that they have no choice but to work picking strawberries, but yet also realize that they are being taken advantage of and that they don’t deserve to live such a life, no one should.

  41. Jonathan v Says:

    Jonathan V
    Ms.Keeble
    Ap Lang and Comp
    Period 1
    Eric Schlosser has the need to express how bad the people in the fields are being worn out in the hot sun, being beaten up slowly by the job. For example, “The strawberry has long been known to migrants as ‘La Fruta Del Diablo’ or the devil’s fruit. Picking strawberries is some of the lowest-paid, most difficult, and least desirable farm work in California” (page 4).when someone thinks about the devil, there is death, hell and extreme temperatures. Those three words are the things that precisely describe the job in the field, a hell that even though it is horrid and miserable the only option is to listen to the devil. The devil is the job they need to have because slowly but surely, the migrants are noticing that without money they are nothing. Another challenge they face are short and long term problems, for example, “Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back, doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities”( Page 4). Bending over is not a pose that was meant for the human body but as agriculture became a big part of American society, the worker demand rose to high. Migrant workers see this opportunity and they see a paying job a better one than the one from their native land. Anything for some money even if it takes being bent over for a long time, anything for money even if it means working for the devil’s crop.

  42. Alicia Osegueta Says:

    Alicia Oseguera
    AP English
    Ms. Keeble
    11 February 2013

     Schlosser uses logos(facts) through-out the article to emphasize all the injustices these migrant workers have to face day by day being a strawberry picker. He outlines different injustices these migrant workers encounter not being able to do anything. Schlosser describes their wages for a day as a strawberry picker and he points out out “Growers producing top-quality berries for the fresh market may pay as much as $7.00 or $8.00 an hour… the fastest workers can earn more than $100 a day”(4). Schlosser is being to the point with this logo making it clear that this exhausting job with so many difficulties does not even pay good. This makes us see that no matter how hard they work $100 is nothing to maintain a family. Schlosser with this highlights how injustice these wages are for the quality of work these workers put in. Later on, Schlosser goes on to explain the different indigenous people that work picking strawberries since is their last option. Schlosser informs, ” At the time, workers were found living in orchards and irrigation ditches. They lived in constant fear of apprehension, like fugitives, and were routinely exploited by their employers…”(5). Schlosser used this fact(logo) to make it clear that many people saw all the injustices these migrant workers had to face. They did not even have a good/healthy house in which they will feel protected and secured. The facts Schlosser gives to make it clear and understandable that these migrant workers go through many injustices while staying silent. 

  43. Ross Hatlen Says:

    Schlosser uses statistics to inform the reader on how the migrant worker suffers. Growers are not able to survive because of the amount they are paid. “five or six will earn at or below the minimum wage, $4.25 an hour, and the rest will earn something in between. ” Four dollars an hour, that is four dollars below the minimum wage line. No one can live on that amount, in the city of Sacramento the average apartment costs $1,178 a month. That does not include bills that they will have to pay or groceries throughout the month. This limits where the growers live, because of the amount they earn they have to live in communal houses. Theses houses are packed and filled with disease and depression. These wages are a crime, but because they are not from America they can’t report them. “The commission estimated that 40 percent of the migrants in the United States–at least 400,000 people–were illegal immigrants” These people have no rights therefore they are taken advantage of. If these men and women were citizens of America, they could get help. To be illegal Is scary, there is a constant fear of being deported. If the migrant workers were to stand up and speak they would end up being deported. The migrant worker has to fight each day to be able to live in this expensive state.

  44. Veronica Says:

    Veronica
    Feb. 12, 2013
    AP English

    Schlosser describes how these migrant workers have to bend in uncomfortable stances for really long periods of time. For example, “One must bend at the waist to pick the fruit, which explains why the job is so difficult. Bending over that way for an hour can cause a stiff back; doing so for ten to twelve hours a day, weeks at a time, can cause excruciating pain and lifelong disabilities”(pg 4, par. 4). By stating this, Schlosser points out how working in these fields is not an easy task and can lead to many back problems. Also, he points out how this job can be demanding as to being quick to pick these strawberries. Secondly, Schlosser states, “There is a strong undercurrent of anxiety in a field being harvested at a piece rate. Workers move down the furrows pushing small wheelbarrows; they pause, bend over, brush away leaves to their left and right, pick berries, place them in boxes, check the plants, and move on, all in one fluid motion,” (pg 4, par. 3). This quick moving pace has a toll on migrants and starts to become exhausting after many hours of repeating this daily routine. Schlosser wants to inform his audience as to what these migrants have to endure in order to earn a living. He uses vivid details to show how hard working these migrants really are and how it’s unfair they are being taken advantage from.

  45. Jessica A Says:

    Jessica A.
    Ms. Keeble
    AP Lang. & Composition, Per. 5
    12 February 2013

    Eric Schossler emphasizes the reader’s understanding of the brutal conditions farmers have to face by equipping the reader with data. He states, “The strawberry has long been known to migrants as “la fruta del diablo”–the fruit of the devil. Picking strawberries is some of the lowest-paid, most difficult, and therefore least desirable farm work in California…begin the process again.” Schossler implants the image of hard-working laborers by detailing the process each laborer has to overcome in order to receive their pay. To do so, he embeds data that he has collected from these strawberry fields in his article, giving the reader a better understanding of the difficulties these farm laborers endured. These detailed accounts of data allow the reader to recognize the toil laborers face.

  46. Efrain E. Says:

    Efrain E.
    Period 1
    AP English 11

    Schlosser uses appeals to pity and sympathy to achieve his purpose. Schlosser describes the horrible conditions in which some migrant workers must live in. He highlights specific examples of the abysmal conditions with passages like,”The few remaining labor camps for single men are grim places. Campo El Toro, a group of whitewashed buildings surrounded by chain-link fences and barbed wire, desolate except for a rosebush in front of the manager’s office, looks like a holding pen or an old minimum-security prison”(Page 4, Paragraph 8), and “The newest migrant workers, who lack family in the area and haven’t yet learned the ropes, often sleep outdoors, in the wooded sections of Prunedale, trespassing, moving to a different hiding place each night. A few years ago, on hillsides above the Salinas Valley, hundreds of strawberry pickers were found living in caves”(Page 4, Paragraph 9). These examples of migrants who have no where to sleep at night spark sympathy and pity within the minds of readers. Any sensible human being would feel horrified if they knew they did not have anywhere to stay for the night. These migrants experience this agony nearly every night, and they wonder if they will survive another day in these horrible conditions. Schlosser’s examples are experiences that not every American may go through, but that they can sympathize with and imagine how hard it can be to undergo.

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